.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Colorful Colorado: Vivid colors, crazy costumes on display at inaugural Unicorn Festival

    A love of all things whimsical led Dana Cain and Michelle Baldwin to create the Unicorn Festival, a first-time event held Sunday in Clement Park.

    For Cain, the mythical animal is not a craze, despite the trendiness of unicorns at the moment.

    “Unicorns symbolize the magical power of the universe,” Cain said. “They symbolize myth and fantasy and imagination and that all things are possible.

    “They bring purity and goodness and joy and strength. They’re just wonderful, wonderful creatures,” she added.

  • Littleton police officer still missing in Russia

    It has been more than two weeks since Olivia Beare last spoke with her husband.

    Steven Beare, an officer with the Littleton Police Department, called his wife around 10:30 p.m. on June 12 from his hotel at the base of Russia’s highest mountain. The following day, Steven planned to ascend Mount Elbrus, an 18,150-foot peak, but has not been seen since his second day of climbing.

  • Hotels, facilities approved near C-470

    Hotels, motels and senior living facilities have been given the go-ahead at C-470 and West Bowles Avenue.

    Despite continued concerns from neighboring residents, the Board of County Commissioners on June 20 unanimously approved rezoning of 23.57 acres of land just east of C-470 and about 700 feet north of West Bowles Avenue. The four parcels are north of Tipsy’s Liquor World.

    For site developer Eisenberg Co., the approval is a win.

  • Area artist uses Makers Marketplace at SW Plaza to sell her pottery

    When Susan Mikkelson walks into the dollar store, the employees don’t have to ask if she needs assistance. They know she is headed straight for the inexpensive glassware.

    The Littleton resident might not be a frequent dinner party host or a glassware collector, but instead, she is a potter who enjoys smashing glassware into tiny shards and incorporating it into her art.

    “That’s why they think I’m crazy at the dollar store,” Mikkelson said with a smile.

  • Rupert seeks voters help to be re-elected

    In 2015, Brad Rupert announced his bid for a seat on the Jeffco school board after three board members — John Newkirk, Ken Witt and Julie Williams — were targeted for recall by community members who felt they lacked accountability, transparency and general respect for the community they were elected to serve. Running on a platform of outcome-focused decision-making and with a desire to rebuild trust in the community, Rupert was ultimately elected treasurer of the board and replaced Williams.

  • Jeffco Libraries working with funds from mill levy increase

    Less than two years after voters agreed to a one-mill property-tax increase, the Jefferson County Public Library System is making good on its promises to library patrons — and has plans to continue doing so.

    A citizens’ advisory committee was organized to help guide plans for the library system’s new funds. Members of the committee, as well as some 5,000 Jeffco residents, asked library officials to:

    • Restore core services.

    • Provide more books and materials.

    • Restore open hours.

  • Houses linked to Deer Creek Golf Club project

    More than 100 single-family homes may soon line a portion of Deer Creek Golf Club in South Jeffco.

    Following a hearing originally held May 3 but continued on June 14, the Jefferson County Planning Commission voted 5-2 to recommend approval of a rezoning request.

  • Multitude of Fourth of July celebrations in South Jeffco

    With Fourth of July fast approaching, it’s time to pull out the American Flag memorabilia and prepare to celebrate the red, white and blue. For those on the prowl for some patriotic fun in South Jeffco, look no further. From the annual Red, White & You Festival in Clement Park to the early morning Columbine Valley parade, there is something for people of all ages.

  • A place of history: Morrison home to one of the few remaining CCC camps

    Walking onto the grounds of the Mount Morrison Civilian Conservation Corps camp is a lot like walking back in time.

    The camp, which provided work to young men during the Great Depression, was once one of 100 in Colorado, but today, it’s one of the few intact CCC camps left in the United States.

  • Q&A with Mike Worcester of West Metro swift water rescue instructor

    As the weather warms, many hit the water for rafting, tubing and fun in the sun.
    But for first responders, the summertime means something a bit different — an increased likelihood for a swift water rescue. To prepare, staff at West Metro Fire Rescue, South Metro Fire Rescue, Denver Fire Department and Westminster Fire Department gathered at Clear Creek in early June for a swift water rescue training course.
    Q: Can you explain the purpose of this training? I know it was a multi-day course.