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Today's News

  • ‘An angel stopped to help — and gave his life’

    Chauncey and Kenny Tate knew Jeffco sheriff’s Sgt. Sean Renfro for just a few minutes, but they will never forget him.

    Renfro stopped to help the Denver brother and sister Saturday after their car crashed on U.S. 285, and he was struck by another vehicle and killed. Chauncey’s 9-month-old son, Angus, also was in their car.

  • Lakewood’s iconic White Fence Farm acquired by Evergreen restaurateurs

    White Fence Farm has new owners, but the legendary fried chicken hasn’t changed.

    Restaurant industry veterans Tom Piercy and Craig Caldwell, who also own Keys on the Green in Evergreen, purchased the iconic family restaurant and farm in November. The business, at 6263 W. Jewell Ave. in Lakewood, had had the same owner, Charlie Wilson, since opening 41 years ago.

  • Littleton council OKs $200,000 loan to city’s urban renewal authority

    The Littleton City Council has approved a $200,000 loan to the city’s urban renewal authority, Littleton Invests For Tomorrow.

    The loan, $50,000 of which was made available immediately and has a payback date of 2019, was approved by the council Dec. 16 on a 5-2 vote. The loan includes a provision that each additional distribution must get council approval.

  • Commissioners allocate $1.5 million in extra raises

    Jeffco’s county commissioners have given initial approval to the distribution of $1.5 million in raises for county employees in several departments.

    The $1.5 million, equal to a 1 percent raise, was included in the 2015 budget to address a rising attrition rate among county employees. The money is in addition to a 2 percent merit-based pay increase in the 2015 budget.

  • 2014: Elections, annexations and school district turmoil

    Midterm elections, muddled annexations and school district gyrations marked 2014 for South Jeffco residents.

    The November election featured several hotly contested races, while a proposed annexation of Southwest Plaza mall by Bow Mar caused consternation for residents of South Jeffco and of the tiny town. Meanwhile, actions by the new school board majority sparked teacher sick-outs, student walkouts and national headlines.

  • The Sports Year in Review

    2014 was quite the year for athletics in South Jeffco. State championships were won, and teams went on amazing runs.  A new sports team was added, and some familiar ones returned to prominence. Though most of those journeys came up short in the end, they will be memorable nevertheless. Without further ado, let’s take a look back on the year that was 2014.

  • Atomic bomb developer Simons dies at 92

    By Ann Imse, For the Courier

    In 1944, Sanford L. Simons had just graduated as a metallurgical engineer when he was drafted by scientists looking for the brightest minds they could find to help create the atom bomb that would go on to win World War II.

  • A celebration of illumination

    By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    Once a year, the Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield turns into a brightly lit fairyland.

    The annual Trail of Lights, which opened Dec. 5, features long and short trails lined with elaborate light displays on every available tree and historic barn. This year the gardens added a few new features, like a three-sided light tunnel and a special light show on weekends.

  • Operation Santa Claus gives the gift of a holiday

    Employees from Lockheed Martin and United Launch Alliance came together last week to continue an almost 60-year tradition of giving back to the community with Operation Santa Claus.

    The holiday gift and food drive was started in 1958 when a group of Glenn L. Martin Co. employees pooled funds to buy presents for area kids who might be going without on Christmas. From there, Operation Santa Claus was born.

  • Shoe store’s longevity tied to customer service

    By Cat Elsby, For the Courier

    Since opening in 1875, Murray’s Shoes has walked the talk: Treat customers like family and take care of their feet. And with fourth- and fifth-generation Murrays running the Littleton store, the soul of the Murray legacy continues.

    Murray’s Shoes originally opened in Illinois and bounced around between cities and family members. Then, in 1983, Jim Murray brought the store to Colorado.