Today's News

  • At Emily’s Parade, love and solidarity

    Columbine High School and Platte Canyon High School are separated by 40 miles and a county line. But on Sunday, the two schools were once again connected by thousands of motorcycles traversing U.S. 285 in a show of solidarity and love.

    More than 4,000 bikers rode from Columbine High to Platte Canyon High as part of Emily’s Parade, an annual event that honors the late Emily Keyes and the six other students held hostage at Platte Canyon High on Sept. 27, 2006, as well as all victims of school violence.

  • Fire safety a hot topic at West Metro Fire Muster

    Potential recruits for West Metro Fire deployed hose, climbed over and under obstacles and dragged dummies to safety on Saturday at Station 10.

    Now they just have to wait 10 to 15 years before applying for jobs as firefighters.

    West Metro’s Fire Muster attracted hundreds to the station at South Kipling Parkway and West Hampden Avenue, site of the district’s training facility. Firefighters put on live-fire demonstrations, displayed ambulances and fire engines, and helped the kids run an expansive obstacle course.

  • School board tensions erupt over accountability committee

    The Jeffco school district’s fledgling accountability committee is looking for volunteers, following a heated discussion last Thursday among school board members.

    The transitional District Accountability Committee is planned to be a group of parents, teachers, community members and a school administrator, among others. Once the school board selects the members of the committee, it is expected to work with school-level accountability groups and the board on a variety of issues, including budgets, test scores and discipline.

  • State to Jeffco: Please return $360,000

    An error by the state apparently resulted in an overpayment of almost $360,000 over three years to the Jeffco Human Services Department.

    Now the state suddenly would like the cash back, despite the fact that the cause of the mistake was found in an audit eight years ago. And the county commissioners aren’t very happy about it.

  • Tori Merritts, candidate in District 4

    Tori Merritts, a former Jeffco school board member of nine years, said she is running for the board again because the school district needs someone experienced to provide guidance.

    Merritts, who served on the school board from 1994 to 2003, is running for Lesley Dahlkemper’s seat in District 4, which is up for election this year. Also contending for the spot is former teacher Amanda Stevens. Merritts is concerned about the possibility of having a completely untested board this fall as a result of three board members facing a recall.

  • Jefferson County officials enact fire ban

    After the wet spring and early summer, things have finally dried out.

    Last Thursday, Jeffco officials announced a fire ban because of continuing high fire danger. Any fires built in must be in existing fire grates at parks and campgrounds.

    In addition, residents are not allowed to:

    • Shoot off fireworks.

    • Smoke anywhere other than an enclosed car or building, or in an area at least 3 feet in diameter that is cleared of combustible material.

    • Do anything else that produces a spark or flame.

  • Littleton rates as 24th most livable city

    The city of Littleton often boasts that it’s a great place to live. It’s not alone in that opinion.

    Littleton was rated the 24th best place to live in the United States by Livability, a company that publishes monthly and annual rankings of the top places to live in the U.S. The ratings list more than 2,000 cities with populations between 20,000 and 350,000 in more than 40 categories, including cost of living, diversity of population, infrastructure, amenities and the education system. 

  • Teachers exhibit artwork at Center for the Arts Evergreen

    A premiere exhibit at the Center for the Arts Evergreen showcases the creative talents of four area high school teachers.

    Steve Sumner, CAE director, is excited about this first-time opportunity to display the exemplary work of teachers who find time to be artists in addition to their responsibilities as art instructors.

    “They’re really worthy,” he said.

  • Chatfield student dies after suffering anaphylactic reaction to peanut

    A 16-year-old Chatfield High School student died Sept. 21 after suffering an allergic reaction to food containing peanuts. 

    According to news reports, Simon Katz was at a bonfire for Chatfield’s homecoming when he ate a s’more that contained peanuts. Katz went into anaphylactic shock soon after eating the food and then died.

    Katz was a guitar player in the band Boats Without Oars, and his Facebook page was filled with messages from friends and fellow musicians. 

  • A painful lesson: Jeffco’s third rail

    I’ve been planning for weeks to offer my thoughts on the controversy surrounding the Jeffco school district. And I’ve also been procrastinating for weeks. Of late, our politically polarized school system has become the third rail of local politics — touch it, and you die.

    A phone call last week from a loyal reader stirred me from my inertia (some would say cowardice). The gentleman raised several good questions about our recent coverage and, as a result, helped me organize my own thoughts. He should call daily.