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Today's News

  • Council declines to change Santa Fe urban renewal plan

    The Littleton City Council declined on March 17 to make changes to the Santa Fe Drive urban renewal plan — a move that would have triggered a citywide election in the wake of voters’ recent approval of Question 300.

    The changes, which would have started the clock on tax-increment financing in the South Santa Fe corridor north of Mineral Drive, originally were presented to the council on Feb. 17. Council members voted then to delay any changes until after the March 3 election.

  • Study groups take over in teacher contract talks

    Jeffco Public Schools and the teachers union have agreed to take part of their current contract negotiations behind closed doors.

    The sides agreed early on to form small groups made up of representatives and experts to examine several priority topics. The smaller groups will meet to come up with options before the full bargaining teams gather again to hammer out a final agreement. The next public negotiations are slated for April 13.

  • School board approves salary guidelines for newly hired Jeffco teachers

    The Jeffco school board has unanimously approved salary guidelines for teachers hired this year who have teaching experience in other districts, have master’s degrees, or are working in hard-to-fill positions.

  • Littleton hires public works director

    Littleton has hired a new public works director.

    Mark Relph was selected from 64 applicants to replace former public works chief Charlie Blosten, who retired Feb. 28. Relph will start his new position on April 14.

  • Principal charged in sexual assault case

    Steven Weigum, the principal of Ute Meadows Elementary School arrested in connection with alleged sexual assault on a minor, was officially charged March 17.

    Weigum, 55, faces counts of aggravated incest, sexual assault on a child by a person in a position of trust, and sexual assault by a person in a position of trust as a pattern, all felonies. An additional charge of invasion of privacy, a misdemeanor, was filed after Weigum’s first court appearance.

  • Return of Hay, Gunkel has Chatfield on track

    By Craig Harper
    For the Courier

    LAKEWOOD — It pained Ryan Hay and Lucas Gunkel that they could only watch as Chatfield missed last year’s 5A boys lacrosse state playoffs while rivals Columbine and Dakota Ridge both advanced. But the seniors are recovered from injuries and their return has helped propel the Chargers to a 3-0 start prior to this week’s spring break trip to Florida and the periphery of the CHSAA poll top 10.

  • Littleton’s 4x200 relay team pulls away

    LAKEWOOD — Andrew Smith, Tre Blake, Eric Lyons and Noah McGhee were determined to top their personal-best time in the 4x200 relay, set just two weeks prior, at the 4A Jeffco Relays. 

    That’s what they did in running a winning time of 1 minute, 32.22 seconds on March 18 at Jeffco Stadium.

    “I just felt really good, and we just had the drive. We wanted to beat Valor,” Smith said.

  • Vance opens the season with a bang

    GOLDEN — Dakota Ridge senior Gillian Vance is excited for the 2015 girls golf season and rightfully so. It’s the last of her high school career. 

    She also feels a little pressure to perform and, well, rightfully so again. Vance, after all, is a three-time state qualifier and wants to end the season with a bang. That’s yet to be decided, but there’s little doubt that she started it with one.

  • The right stuff

    A group of military veterans who had geared up in South Jeffco spent last week at the National Sports Center for the Disabled in Winter Park.

    The dozen veterans from across the country were at the Sports Authority at Bowles Crossing on March 10 to load up on everything from wool socks to ski goggles before making the trip up the mountain to participate in numerous winter sports.

  • School district, teachers open talks

    Negotiators for the Jeffco school district and the teachers union waded into collective bargaining last week, and while pledges of cooperation remain in the air, some friction around compensation has already made an early appearance.

    The union’s entire contract is on the table this year, and the district and the union spent most of their first two sessions laying out each side’s specific interests and defining logistics for how bargaining sessions would be structured. Negotiations could run through May.