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Today's News

  • SHERIFF'S CALLS

    Joe Blow

  • Jeffco ordered to pay family of Jennifer Lobato $2.5 million in jail death suit

    A federal judge awarded the family of Jennifer Lobato $2.5 million to settle a civil rights lawsuit against Jefferson County.

    Lobato, 37, and a mother of seven, was booked March 2, 2015, into the Jefferson County Jail on suspicion of shoplifting $57 worth of merchandise from a Lakewood Old Navy story with her 16-year-old son. The following day, Lobato complained of feeling ill and reportedly vomited several times. She died in her cell the night of March 3, 2015, after waiting hours in vain for medical attention.

  • D’Evelyn principal arrested on suspicion of domestic violence

    The principal of D’Evelyn Junior/Senior High School was arrested early Thursday on suspicion of domestic violence and has been placed on leave from his position at the school.

    Anthony Edwards, 36, faces misdemeanor charges of third-degree assault and domestic violence, said Jeffco sheriff’s spokeswoman Jenny Fulton.

    Sheriff’s officers were called to Edwards’ South Jeffco home about midnight Wednesday.

  • Leonard faces sentencing for contempt of court in divorce case

    Republican Tim Leonard may have won his election in state House District 25, but a lingering divorce case with his ex-wife, Monica, has resulted in a contempt-of-court citation against him.

  • Variety of services available to victims of domestic violence

    Editor’s note: This is one installment in a multi-part series exploring the issue of domestic violence in recognition of National Domestic Violence Month, which was observed in October.

    For every domestic violence crime that’s reported, countless others aren’t — but they don’t go unnoticed. 

  • ‘Top responder’ retires from Inter-Canyon

    After 33 years of service, volunteer firefighter Mark Bigler is bidding farewell to the Inter-Canyon Fire Department.

    Bigler, who joined the department in 1983, first saw firefighting as a way to give back to the foothills community. But ultimately the gig helped him feel at home in an area where it can be tough to meet new people.

  • Foothills board presented with ‘status quo’ 2017 budget

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District is planning next year for a 0.5 percent increase in revenues and expenses, according to the proposed 2017 budget presented Oct. 25 to the district’s board of directors.

    “It’s a status quo budget,” said Foothills executive director Ron Hopp. “We’re proud of the fact that we’re going to be able to continue to receive nearly 70 percent of our revenue from earned income and less from property taxes.”

  • Woman lost sense of well-being; friend lost her life

    Editor’s note: This is one installment in a multi-part series exploring the issue of domestic violence in recognition of National Domestic Violence Month, which was observed in October.

    Darkness shrouds the door to Jenn’s home to such an extent that you don’t realize there’s a door there at all — until the porch light flickers on abruptly, betraying your presence to anyone and everyone nearby.

    Perhaps it’s just a default setting, but maybe it’s something more.

    Maybe it’s fear.

  • Foothills Park District revenues up, expenses down through third quarter

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District is in a positive financial position as revenues are up and expenses are down through the third quarter, according to a financial update presented Oct. 25 by administrative services director Dennis Weiner.

  • Groundwater not tested after toxin found at Lockheed

    Neither the Colorado health department nor Lockheed Martin tested groundwater at the company’s Waterton Canyon facility in South Jeffco after a toxic waste deposit was discovered there last October.

    Publicly disclosed about a month ago, the solid waste deposit was a sodium nitrate waste salt containing hexavalent chromium — a toxin known to cause cancer — and it measured approximately 1 to 2 feet thick, 20 feet wide and 50 feet long, according to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment.