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Today's News

  • Block party

    The train derailment was fraught with the potential for mayhem, as pizza and Ninja Turtles sailed through the air at Bemis Library.

    But it does help to have a contingent of dedicated hobbyists on hand to pick up the pieces — and snap them back together.

    The library on Saturday hosted the creations of the Denver Lego Users’ Group and the Colorado/Wyoming Lego Users’ Group, whose members had spent hours the night before assembling a massive Lego city, complete with operating trains, a working carousel, Batman and at least a few aliens. 

  • Caps and trade

    Several a-fungi-anados gathered at Flying J Ranch last Friday morning to learn about mushrooms in the mountain area of Jefferson County.

    “We have between 2,000 and 3,000 mushroom species just in this area,” said Mary Beth Carpenter, a volunteer with the Lookout Mountain Nature Center.

    About a dozen people showed up for “Beyond Pizza: What Everyone Should Know About Mushrooms.” Carpenter led the talk on families of fungus.

  • MacBean's purchases: a breathtaking spending spree

    After former Inter-Canyon fire chief David MacBean was sentenced to eight years in prison for theft, current chief Randy Simpson said he and the department had been waiting a long time for the day of reckoning.

    “It feels like a huge weight has been lifted off our shoulders,” Simpson said outside the courtroom Friday evening. “This has been 19 months of hard work. I never expected to be in this position.”

    Simpson became volunteer chief in April after MacBean’s theft of more than $647,000 from the department surfaced in March 2013.

  • High temps dangerous for dogs on hikes

    Two dogs have died and eight more with heat-stroke symptoms have been evacuated so far this summer in Jefferson County Open Space parks.

    In most of the cases, county officials found out about the dogs when owners called the non-emergency Jeffco sheriff’s dispatch number to ask for help, said Mary Ann Bonnell, the visitor services supervisor who also oversees the county's park ranger program. Jeffco officials do not release names of dead or injured pets or their owners.

  • Jeffco gathering details on town's proposal to annex Southwest Plaza

    Residents of Jeffco and Bow Mar will have to wait several weeks before the final details of the town's proposed annexation of Southwest Plaza will be available. 

    The county is calculating how much it spends on law enforcement services for the mall and on street maintenance, including snow plowing, for the portions of South Sheridan Boulevard and West Bowles Avenue that Bow Mar would have to claim for the "flagpole" annexation.

  • 10,00 Maniacs, Marshall Tucker headline Rocky Mountain Music Fest

    The Rocky Mountain Music Festival is set to provide concert-goers with a taste of the classic and a taste of the new. 

    The all-day concert Aug. 10 at Clement Park features headliners 10,000 Maniacs kicking off the day’s music and the Marshall Tucker Band closing the show at night. In between the two classic bands, the audience will hear eight local groups battling for the title of best blues, rock, country and acoustic bands in the Rockies.

  • Wages breaking down barriers

    The numbers don’t lie. Trevor Wages had an exemplary basketball career while at the Colorado School of Mines.

  • 2014 boys golf season preview capsules

    COLUMBINE REBELS
    Head coach: Tim Capra
    Classification: 5A Jeffco League
    Players to watch: Michael Tait, Sr.; Marcus Tait, Soph.; Chase Anderson, Soph.; Evan Tooley, Sr.
    Season opener: Aug. 11, 5A Jeffco League opener, Broken Tee Golf Course, Englewood
    State championship: Sept. 29-30, Colorado Springs Country Club

  • Rebels’ Tait turns full attention to the links

    It was springtime, yet Michael Tait was already looking ahead. Sure, the multi-sport Columbine High athlete was having a stellar baseball season, but his mind was pondering what was to come this fall. In particular, playing football and golf in the same season again.

  • BROTHERS IN ARMS

    The life of a minor league baseball player isn’t always glamorous. There is a lot of bus time, roadside motels and catering tables serving up lunch meat and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. After the game, dinner, in all likelihood, is leftover concession stand food, and then you do it all over again the next day.

    One’s apartment may have the bare essentials — an air mattress, suitcase, basic furniture and no air conditioning. But it’s the life that twin brothers Taylor and Tyler Rogers share, be it thousands of miles apart.