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Today's News

  • 2012 fall sports previews: Softball

    COLUMBINE REBELS
    Head coach: Robin Ortiz
    Classification: 5A Jeffco
    2011 record: 10-12
    2011 recap: The Rebels finished fifth in the league following a competitive season in which Columbine was “much more competitive than the previous two seasons,” Ortiz said.
    Players to watch: Tedi Gomez, Sr., P/OF: Blythe Befus, Sr., 2B; Abby Conrad, Sr., OF; Carly Perry, Soph., SS; Jessica Gilliam, Soph., P/1B; Madison Reuter, Soph., P/1B
    Season opener: Aug. 22, vs. Douglas County, 4 p.m.

  • Deer Creek Challenge ride canceled due to low numbers

    Race director Pat Downing, in an e-mail sent to participants last week, announced that the Deer Creek Challenge bicycle ride, scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 19, has been canceled because of low registration numbers.

  • Lions show their youth, promise in 2012 opener

    CENTENNIAL — Scott Robb has yet to step foot in a classroom at Littleton High School, but the rising freshman has taken his first swing of the club for the Lions’ boys golf team. Sophomores Jake Meitzmaker and Jacob Fuchs saw their first varsity action as well Aug. 9 at South Suburban Golf Course.
    Sure, it could’ve been better. It also could’ve been a lot worse.

  • Sloan, Falcons set target to shoot for

    DENVER — Jared Sloan knows there’s a little bit of pressure. He can feel it. After all, the Front Range Christian golfer is the only returning 3A state qualifier on this year’s squad.
    And though he carded a respectable 12-over-par 83 on Aug. 9 at the season-opening Mile High League match at the challenging Wellshire Golf Club, Sloan could’ve shot better, he said.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    The oracle speaks

  • Residential use proposed for 2-acre parcel on South Platte Canyon Road

    Community members appeared generally pleased that a property owner wants to rezone a vacant 2-acre property on South Platte Canyon Road for townhomes, condominiums, single-family houses or assisted-living units.

    The land is zoned C-1 commercial but has been on the market for 10 years and has failed to attract interest. It is bordered on the north by DePew Street and on the east by South Platte Canyon Road.

    The area could appeal to people who want to live close to the Columbine Trail, an asphalt bicycle path that borders the property along Platte Canyon Road.

  • Principals fear dire consequences if 3A/3B don’t pass

    Editor’s note: The Courier is publishing a series of articles examining arguments on both sides of Jeffco Public Schools’ proposed property-tax increase.

    Principals at Jeffco schools are concerned about the increased class sizes and decreased support staff they will face if voters reject two proposed tax increases in November.

  • Zoning officials OK parking off-duty cabs in residential areas

    The Jeffco Board of Adjustment voted unanimously Aug. 8 to uphold the zoning administrator's decision to allow parking of off-duty taxis on the street in a residential subdivision.

    The Columbine Knolls North Home Owners Association had appealed to the board to reverse the zoning administrator's decision that the practice was legal according to county rules.

    But zoning administrator Mike Chadwick said the rules are evolving under the incumbent Board of Commissioners and becoming more liberal on the subject.

  • Mauser pens book about emotional journey after Columbine

    Thirteen years after the tragedy, a father whose son was killed in the Columbine High School shootings on April 20, 1999, has written a book about his struggle to come to terms with grief and rise above the horrible events that shattered his family's life.

    "Walking in Daniel's Shoes," by Tom Mauser, is a factual and sometimes emotional account by a parent of what happens to a family when a child is murdered.

  • Study finds more rare plant, animal species in Jeffco

    By Laura Bernero

    For the Courier

    A two-year study in Jeffco has identified 35 rare plants and 11 rare animal species that the county will try to protect in its future conservation efforts and open space plans.

    The biodiversity survey, which also identified one rare fungus, was conducted by scientists from the Colorado Natural Heritage Program over the past two growing seasons. County Open Space planners will use the data to help make environmentally conscious choices when planning open space areas, parks and trails.