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Today's News

  • Neighbors oppose development plan at Kipling and Quincy

    A developer’s plan to build nearly 250 apartments near the federal prison at Kipling and Quincy is drawing the ire of local residents.

    About 150 people attended a community meeting April 3 that the developer held as part of the county’s rezoning process, and many raised concerns about increased traffic and spoiled views of the mountains.

  • West Metro appoints fire chief

    Newly appointed Fire Chief Don Lombardi of West Metro Fire Rescue plans to expand the department’s role in non-emergency health care and citizen safety training.

    On Tuesday, April 3, the district board unanimously voted to hire Lombardi as its next chief. Lombardi has been with West Metro for 21 years and had served as interim fire chief since October 2011, when Chief Douglas McBee retired.

    Lombardi grew up in Littleton and attended the University of Colorado, where he earned his bachelor of science degree.

  • ‘Tommy’ turns arts center into visual, audio feast

    Violent strobes of color, energized dance and a backdrop of renowned psychedelic rock saturate the senses in the Littleton Town Hall Arts Center’s production of “Tommy,” a nearly overwhelming contrast to the title character’s catatonic state.

  • Getting the jump on fitness

    E.J. Boillot keeps jumpers hopping twice a week at Ute Meadows Elementary from late September through July and August for two and half hours a day. “It’s pretty much year-round. In an off-World year, guys will be done around the last of June. We wouldn’t go again until September,” Boillot said. “But with this being a World year, they’ll stay jumping, competing, staying in shape until the 8th of August. Then we’ll start again around the 15th of September.”

  • Reverse-911 glitches fixed, county reports

    Glitches in the emergency notification system that caused a number of homes that were supposed to be evacuated during the Lower North Fork Fire to be passed over for reverse-911 calls have now been fixed, a Jefferson County official said.

    Problems with FirstCall Network, the emergency notification company that Jeffco uses, caused fewer than 120 homes in the evacuation area not to receive the evacuation call, according to Jeff Irvin, executive director of the Jefferson County Emergency Communications Authority.

  • Make your voice heard on wildfires

    Several years ago, when I was still a state legislator, I carried a bill to provide tax breaks for volunteer firefighters to offset the costs of their safety equipment. These volunteers, who are on the front lines of wildfire response in most mountain areas, must often buy their own boots, helmet, jackets and other personal protective equipment. A tax credit would allow more volunteers to serve their communities, helping all citizens in the process.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    It’s the thought that counts

  • Jeffco Relays serve as breather

    ARVADA — The stresses of a high school swimming season can become apparent just prior to the push for league and state championships.
    With state six weeks away, swimmers have spent numerous hours in the pool building up the anxiety of high expectations. Just as the mental strain could overcome an athlete’s psyche, the unique opportunity of the Jeffco League Relays provided an escape from pressures the season can bring.

  • Red-hot Cougars thump Chargers

    LAKEWOOD — One look at the Evergreen boys’ lacrosse team’s 8-0 record and it’s easy to see that they are having a red-hot season. So when they defeated the Chatfield Chargers 12-5 on April 4 at Trailblazer Stadium, the only thing that was shocking was that it was the first time the Cougars had beat the Chargers.

  • HEART-THUMPING ACTION

    E.J. Boillot knows quite a bit about jump roping. After all, he was a physical education teacher for 23 years at Ute Meadows Elementary School. But 20 years ago, while teaching jump roping in his P.E. class, competing in it through the American Heart Association and then watching a team in Boulder compete, Boillot was ready to take the next step and build a team of his own.
    A competitive team at that.
    It took a while to get kids involved, but Boillot has done just that with the Jumping Eagles.