Today's News

  • Help in the fight against MS

    It’s often said, “ ‘Tis a pleasure to live in Colorado.” And it is. We have some of the best quality of life of anywhere in the world. But one odd blemish that researchers have yet to fully understand is why we have a higher incidence of multiple sclerosis than most anywhere else.

  • Lady Eagles save best for last

    LAKEWOOD — Haley Milhollan was scared. Kayla Latham was freaking out. But you would’ve never known it.

    With their Dakota Ridge girls soccer team playing a stalemate through regulation and two 15-minute overtime periods with 14th-seeded Cherry Creek in the second round of the 5A state tournament, victory was hinging on penalty kicks.

  • Chargers’ No. 2 doubles take third at state

    DENVER — In an unexpected, but very welcome turn of events, the Chatfield’s No. 2 girls tennis doubles team took third place in the 5A state finals at the Gates Tennis Center on May 14.

    “I knew we could place,” senior Sarah Dubetz said after teaming with sophomore Maddie Managhani to score a 6-1, 4-6, 6-4 win over Grand Junction’s Stephanie Skinner and Nicky Arja in the third-place match, “but there were a lot of people who didn’t think that we would get this far.”

  • Columbine strikes out Mustangs

    ARVADA — Mike Thill’s right arm felt like, in his words, a noodle. But it was well worth it. After all Columbine wasn’t supposed to win, but it did.

  • Chatfield just misses out on title

    ARVADA — Chatfield looked to be one event away from a league championship. Then came the breaststroke.

    Lakewood High School took four of the top five spots in the event to surge into the lead and held on to best the Chargers, denying them of their first league title in school history at the Jefferson County League boys swimming championships at Meyers Pool on May 14.

    Lakewood scored 446 points, beating out Chatfield by nine points. Ralston Valley came in third. Columbine finished with 109 points.

  • Proposed zoning changes would allow short-term rentals

    The Jefferson County commissioners are mulling revisions to zoning ordinances that could allow short-term vacation rentals of single-family homes.

    County zoning staff presented a draft of changes at a May 10 meeting with the commissioners, who initially rejected the revisions, citing overly complex requirements the resolution would place on applicants.

  • County scraps program to control West Nile virus

    Jefferson County has ended its West Nile virus prevention program, citing budget cuts that will not allow the health department to control mosquito populations.

    Jeffco previously hired contractors to evaluate and treat potential mosquito breeding grounds across the county. Beginning this year, property owners will no longer benefit from the service, though the health department will provide guidance regarding mosquito control.

    Mosquitoes, which can carry West Nile virus, breed in standing water and can hatch up to 250 eggs within seven to 10 days.

  • Value of average Jeffco home down 1 percent

    The average Jeffco home lost 1 percent of its value during the two-year period that ended June 30, 2010, according to an analysis of 149,000 homes by the county assessor.

    Notices of valuation went out to homeowners May 1.

    Median values are down nearly everywhere across the county as follows: South Jeffco, minus 1.2 percent; Lakewood, minus 1.2 percent; and Golden, minus 1.4 percent.

    The exception to declining value and lower tax bills will be homeowners who made significant improvements or additions. They are likely to see increases in actual value.

  • Beloved rabbi retiring from B'nai Chaim

    It’s a Friday afternoon at B’nai Chaim, and Rabbi Joel Schwartzman is running between the building’s two floors, trying to reconcile temperatures between the freezing ground level and the balmy basement.

    In about two hours, 200 congregants would pack the small Reform Judaism synagogue for a night of musical devotion, a treat Schwartzman and his wife, Ziva, provided a few weeks before his July 2 retirement.

  • ‘Getting her life back’

    Editor’s note: The Courier has been following Ashley Bissel in her fight against a rare form of brain cancer. This is the final installment in the series.


    Ashley Bissel wears a simple charm bracelet, a chain of loose silver links adorned with a single a accoutrement, a small ribbon of the same metal.

    She grasps the tiny charm between her thumb and forefinger, absorbing its smooth texture and savoring the significance.

    Every May 15, she plans to add another.