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Today's News

  • Chargers face their fears to rout Warriors

    Fear remains one of the best motivators in life.

    On Dec. 11, fear produced one of the most fundamentally sound basketball games the Chatfield boys program has produced in arguably a decade.

    Fresh off an upset loss to Palmer, the Chargers unleashed darn near every ounce of talent and teamwork in their bodies as they throttled second-ranked Arapahoe 66-44 in a Class 5A nonleague victory.

  • Dakota Ridge falls to Aspen

    The Dakota Ridge Eagles just couldn’t keep from flying back to its coup.

    Unfortunately for the Eagles, their nest happened to reside in the penalty box, and their opponent was more than appreciative of the odd-man advantage.

    Aspen scored four goals, all on the power-play, to top Dakota Ridge 4-0 on Dec. 12 at the Edge Ice Arena.

    When the Eagles managed to keep all of their skaters on the ice, they were able to hang with Aspen and nearly took a 1-0 lead in the first period when Jason Refka’s wrister from the slot banged off the left post.

  • CDOT Launches free iPhone App

    The Colorado Department of Transportation is launching a new iPhone application to help people make smart choices about designating a sober driver. Increased “Heat Is On” DUI enforcement began over the Thanksgiving weekend and will continue at various times through New Year’s.

  • Scandal-obsessed media sell us short

    Another season, another scandal. This time, a minor car accident in Florida gave rise to a story that culminated in Tiger Woods issuing a public statement confessing to “transgressions.”

    In what appears to be a semi-annual ritual, the press is having a field day with the foibles of another celebrity. Talk shows talk. Experts offer opinions. Eyebrows are raised. Heads move gravely from side to side.

    Are we the better for it?

  • Jeffco Action Center receives grant

    The Jeffco Action Center has received a $40,000 Daniels Fund grant to support its programs.

  • 24-year sentence in ‘76 murder of South Jeffco woman

    Ricky Lee Harnish, 54, received the maximum sentence of 24 years in prison for the 1976 rape and murder of South Jeffco resident Holly Marie Andrews, under the terms of a plea agreement.

    The sentencing was handed out Monday in a Georgetown court in front of members of Andrews’ family.

    Clear Creek County Sheriff Don Krueger said he felt relieved the case was finally over after so many years. He added that Harnish had been in county custody for more than a year.

  • Find another solution to schools’ budget crisis

    In an effort to understand the Jefferson County Public Schools budget crisis, I believe I may have stumbled onto a solution. Most of the district-promoted suggestions for reducing the budget include relatively minor concessions by the district administration, partial to wholesale elimination of assistant principals and librarians, partial elimination of counselors, support staff, school secretaries, paraprofessionals, clinic aides, and of course, teachers.

  • Chatfield pins down Columbine

    Tony Pena may have changed schools and classifications, but his attitude and confidence have remained in tact.

    Pena, wrestling up at 130 pounds on Dec. 10, threw Columbine’s Ben Rhodes around – literally, including one takedown that sent Rhodes down hard onto the exposed hardwood – for close to two periods before scoring a pinfall at the 3-minute, 59-second mark in Chatfield’s 53-24 victory at Chatfield Senior High School.

  • Zinna wins lawsuit against former commissioner

     

    Longtime county critic Mike Zinna won his First Amendment lawsuit Dec. 9 against former county commissioner Jim Congrove when jurors awarded him $1,791 — a number corresponding with the year the Bill of Rights was ratified.

    The former talk-radio host and gadfly blogger alleged Congrove and others violated his First Amendment rights by taking steps to prevent him from speaking at public hearings and to halt his investigations into county government.

  • County administrator confirms moves against Zinna

    County Administrator Jim Moore testified in a federal lawsuit last week that, in 2005, the Jeffco commissioners actively tried to silence longtime county critic Mike Zinna.

    “They were very displeased. They wanted him to stop,” Moore said, referring to the former commission’s reaction to stories posted on Zinna’s websites. “They generally talked about ways to shut him up, shut him down. … There was discussion about evicting him from the airport.”