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Today's News

  • Littleton council weighs parking-sign rules

    A lack of consistency in parking signage on private property and a “predatory” towing culture in Littleton have the City Council considering a measure to standardize private-parking signs.

    In several recent instances, cars have been towed from one parking lot with a “no parking” sign positioned about 12 feet high, a notice council members seemed to agree was inadequate.

  • Jeffco libraries keeping a few best-sellers available on the shelves

    Author Robert Crais’ latest Elvis Cole suspense mystery novel, “Taken,” amassed 165 Jefferson County Library reservations, with patrons claiming their spots online for one of 45 copies.

    For Jonathan Safran Foer’s best-seller “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close,” which was recently made into a film, 154 people parked in the online queue for any of 33 circulating copies, potentially waiting weeks for the book.

  • Penalties considered for violations by pot dispensaries

    The Littleton City Council is considering penalties that the city’s four medical marijuana dispensaries could face if found to be in violation of city or state code.

    Under the proposal, penalties would be substantially stiffer for dispensaries than for similar violations at liquor stores, which are also regulated by the city’s licensing authority. In many cases, violations ranging from selling to an underage customer or a patient consuming marijuana on the premises would result in a license revocation.

  • Book sorters telling a problematic tale

    Automated book sorters that cost the Jeffco Public Library $2.6 million and came with innumerable service headaches recently offered another surprise — the Swiss manufacturer Bibliotheca apparently used the library system as a beta test for one of the company’s complex machines.

    The book sorters — a computerized assembly of belts and rollers that scan and sort materials via radio-frequency chips implanted in them — were acquired to increase efficiency and reduce the number of staff required to sort books and return them to shelves.

  • ‘A church where the table’s always set’

    Swaying with their hands in the air and chanting bits of a chorus as they learn the words, about 90 people fill the cafeteria at Grant Ranch Elementary School, where the Bridge Church is holding its first service.

    With a little more than half of the folding chairs filled on the Sunday morning, the faithful take in a morning of sermon and musical prayer. The church band, accented by magenta stage lights, leads the Mass in 15 minutes of song.

  • Linda Stoll wins Silver Leadership Award

    Linda Stoll, executive director of food services for Jeffco Public Schools, received the Silver Leadership Award during the National Foodservice Achievement Management Excellence award ceremony on Jan. 15.

     

  • Santorum wins statewide GOP straw poll

    Jeffco Republicans narrowly favored presidential candidate Mitt Romney over Rick Santorum in Tuesday’s straw poll, though Santorum prevailed in the statewide caucus results by more than 5 percentage points.

    Ron Paul and Newt Gingrich lagged severely behind, each garnering about 12 percent of the vote, both in Jefferson County and statewide. Detailed results for the Arapahoe County precinct caucuses were not available Tuesday evening.

  • National signing day

    The first Wednesday in February holds a lot of meaning for student-athletes. For many, it's the bridging of their lives from high school to college, from adolescence to adulthood. It is National Signing Day, the first day — besides a one-week period in November — in which they can sign their letter-of-intent to play athletics at the next level. The following is a list of area athletes who were celebrated on Feb. 1 for making a commitment toward their future:

  • A voyage into learning

    In the summer of 1856, Capt. Samuel Comstock took 32 men from New Bedford, Mass., into the North Atlantic, beginning a three-year sojourn that would claim the life of one crewman and hundreds of sperm whales.

    Etched neatly into a tattered and fading logbook are the details of that voyage, from a time when homes across the country glowed dimly from hurricane lanterns burning whale oil. The logbook, a 300-page nautical and financial record of the Governor Troup ship, sat virtually untouched for a century and a half.

  • Jeffco employees offered healthy incentive to take survey

    Jefferson County is offering most of its full-time employees $50 to take online health-assessment surveys, a program for which it has set aside more than $100,000.

    Though the surveys, which are an attempt to make employees more aware of their personal health risks, would cost $119,000 if all employees with health benefits participate, the county anticipates a response of only 40 to 50 percent.

    “We have a certain budget for all wellness, and this is a component of it,” county Human Resources Director Jennifer Fairweather said.