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Today's News

  • Boost in school-lunch price brings added funds

    Since implementing a 25 percent price increase for most school lunches earlier this year, Jeffco Public Schools has begun netting a profit in its food services fund, money that is currently sitting idle.

    In the first financial quarter of the school year, the district netted nearly $765,000 more than during the same period last year, representing positive income of $409,500 — a substantial departure from 2010, when the fund operated at a loss.

  • Commissioners pass budget with potential pay raises for employees

    Some Jeffco sheriff’s employees are now eligible for overdue merit-based pay increases, after the county commissioners passed on a 2-1 vote Dec. 6 a budget that allocates an additional $1.4 million to the department for discretionary spending in 2012.

    Overall, the $476 million county budget cuts $600,000 from the 2011 spending plan and includes $3.5 million in funds to be used at the discretion of department heads, including pay increases for subordinates.

  • Don’t take liberties for granted

    The Jefferson County League of Women Voters’ co-presidents, Sue Vaughan and Ann Roux, are marking the 220th anniversary of the adoption of the Bill of Rights (Dec. 15) with a call for inclusive political discourse and greater civic participation.

  • Sheriff's Calls

    Blinded by the light

  • State Supreme Court affirms congressional redistricting lines

    The Colorado Supreme Court on Monday affirmed Denver Judge Robert Hyatt’s congressional redistricting map, lines that take Mike Coffman’s District 6 out of Jefferson County and lump South Jeffco into District 1, represented by Democrat Diana Degette.

    Supreme Court judges heard arguments Dec.1 in the appeal of Hyatt’s decision, which was filed by Douglas County and others. Though the court released its decision Monday morning, a written opinion was not yet available.

  • Columbine Rebels capture 5A state football championship

    DENVER -- Bernard McDondle rushed for 249 yards and two touchdowns and older brother Cameron McDondle rushed for two more scores and threw for another as the Columbine Rebels, seeded No. 1 in 5A, won their fifth state football championship since 1999 and first in five years on Dec. 3 with a 41-31 win over Lakewood at Sports Authority Field at Mile High.

  • Foothills again delays land sale

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District has again postponed a controversial $2.7 million sale of more than 17 acres of land near South Simms and South Ward streets to a housing developer.
    About 25 Shadow Ridge neighborhood residents and others packed the district’s meeting room on Nov. 22 to protest the sale, which many said violates one of Foothills’ own resolutions from 1999 that specified the land in question was to remain as undeveloped open space.

  • Foothills again delays land sale

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District has again postponed a controversial $2.7 million sale of more than 17 acres of land near South Simms and South Ward streets to a housing developer.
    About 25 Shadow Ridge neighborhood residents and others packed the district’s meeting room on Nov. 22 to protest the sale, which many said violates one of Foothills’ own resolutions from 1999 that specified the land in question was to remain as undeveloped open space.

  • Jeffco schools official appointed to CU Board of Regents

    Gov. John Hickelooper on Nov. 18 appointed a high-level Jeffco Public Schools employee to the University of Colorado Board of Regents.
    Office of Diversity and Inclusion director Irene Griego, a former community superintendent, was tapped to fill a vacancy on the CU board created by Monisha Merchant’s departure. Griego will remain in the office until at least next year’s general election in November, when a successor for the final two years of the six-year term will be selected in Congressional District 7.

  • Living a cloistered life in Littleton

    By Laura Herrington
    For the Courier
    On a recent Monday just before 6:30 a.m., 30 of the faithful motor up a partially hidden driveway to the historic house at 6138 S. Gallup St. They trickle into a small, unadorned chapel and sit scattered on the wooden pews, waiting for Mass to begin.