.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • The sun sets on another summer

    As fall approaches, it’s time to say goodbye to summer.

    And what better way to do that than by taking part in a South Jeffco tradition that’s entering its 29th year? 

    The Summerset Festival, which takes place at Clement Park this Friday through Sunday, has become a yearly ritual for many area residents. The three days of activities offer something for everyone, said Laura Knowlton, executive director of the Foothills Foundation.

  • The climb to independence

    A fly fisherman who’d been working a river at Eldorado Canyon State Park watched a group of beginner climbers slowly work their way up the rock as he walked back to his truck. 

    “Are those kids blind?” he exclaimed.

    Of the dozen and a half people on the four established climbing routes, almost all were visually impaired. The climbers were students of the independence training program at the Colorado Center for the Blind in Littleton. 

  • City Council performs pot pirouette

    The Littleton City Council has changed course and will now vote on a resolution banning retail marijuana sales, after giving initial support to the idea. 

    During the end of the council’s Sept. 3 meeting, which lasted until just before 3 a.m. Sept. 4 due to the contentious hearing on the Broadstone at Littleton Station development, Mayor Debbie Brinkman proposed changing a proposed ordinance allowing retail marijuana sales to an ordinance banning sales of retail marijuana.

  • Five seek appointment to vacant seat on school board
  • School board candidates trade views

    The races for three open seats on the Jeffco Board of Education officially started at Monday’s candidate forum at Green Mountain High School.

    More than 100 people packed the school’s auditorium to listen to school board candidates and their plans for Colorado’s largest school district.

    “I’m really glad I came out tonight,” Jeffco parent Connie Potter said after the forum. “I heard some really good things on some key issues.”

  • Sports briefs

    BOYS SOCCER
    Holmes, Overholt carry Chatfield past D’Evelyn
    LAKEWOOD
    — Lee Holmes scored twice and Ben Overholt added a penalty kick goal as Chatfield held off D’Evelyn 3-2 in the third-place game of the South Jeffco Invite on Sept. 7 at Lakewood Memorial Field.

  • A-West runs away with tri-meet vs. Chatfield, Evergreen

    ARVADA — Juggling academics and athletics is a challenge for any high school athlete, especially early in the school year. The Chatfield Chargers’ gymnastics team knows that.
    Their tri-meet Sept. 5 at Arvada West High School, which included 4A Evergreen, was pretty much a one-sided affair, as the host Lady Wildcats were dominant in all four events. Arvada West had the top two scorers in every event, including the top five in the balance beam, to score 178.55 points. Chatfield was second with 162.025, and Evergreen was third at 148.575.

  • Chargers score at will vs. Angels

    DENVER — Hurry-up offenses are all the vogue in football, but Chatfield seemingly gets plays off at warp speed. And in Week 2, the Chargers scored in the wink of an eye, too.
    “It’s going really fast,’’ said senior receiver Jahrel Olson, one of the big benefactors of Chatfield’s move to a no-huddle, quick-snap offense with an increased emphasis on the forward pass. “We practice it so many times it’s becoming second nature.’’

  • Starr rises for Dakota Ridge

    LAKEWOOD — Austin Starr walked up to Bear Creek goalkeeper Derrick Kipp prior to Dakota Ridge’s game with the Bears and declared that he was going to score on him. It was all in fun, as Starr and Kipp have been club teammates on the U-17 Colorado United White for the past two years. But not even Starr could envision how true his statement was about to become.

  • On Syria, I’ll trust the experts

    When Syrian President Bashar al-Assad used chemical weapons on his country’s citizens, killing more than 1,400 people, including defenseless children, he crossed a line for most Americans. While there is still much consternation over whether a military response is appropriate and, if so, how we limit our exposure and don’t get sucked into another seemingly endless intervention, there seems to be some consensus that the act of gassing innocents in Syria deserves a response.