Today's News

  • Eagles shake early nerves

    If there’s one thing that Dakota Ridge head coach Marv Van Lingen has been working on with the Lady Eagles, it’s putting together a complete game. The way the Sept. 28 “Think Pink” game started for both Dakota Ridge and visiting Chatfield, it didn’t appear either team was likely to do that. But Dakota Ridge settled down, started focusing on its hitting, and executed.
    The end result was an 11-4 victory, thanks to an eight-run fourth inning,

  • Chatfield saves best for last, wins Jeffco

    Mark Koza called it the best that the Chatfield Chargers have played all year. As the Chargers’ boys tennis head coach, there’s not much more he could ask for, considering it was the regular-season finale and it was against Lakewood, with the 5A Jeffco League championship hanging in the balance.
    Starting with John Koza’s straight-set victory at No. 1 singles, the Chargers won all seven bouts in a 7-0 win on Sept. 26 at the Ken-Caryl Ranch House.

  • Rain, mud can’t slow Hume, Cobb

    Make no bones about it, Dakota Ridge senior Carson Hume would’ve preferred to have won the Dave Sanders Invitational on Sept. 27 at Clement Park. That’s the competitor in him speaking. But sixth place on a rainy, muddy day wasn’t too shabby.
    Hume finished the 3.1-mile course in 16 minutes, 22 seconds.
    “We’ve been doing a lot of hard training. Things are not turning yet. It was kind of a getting-into-fitness race still,” Hume said. “I would’ve liked to have been up there, but today’s not the day.”

  • Scooters, pocket bikes, mo-peds, etc.

    The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office has noted a wave of community questions, concerns and confusion as electric- and gas-powered scooters have increased in popularity. Often called “go-peds” or “razor scooters,” these vehicles look more like small motorcycles than simple scooters.

  • Sheriff's Calls


    In the Dream House

  • Dumped meth containers spur road closure

    A small section of road near Harriman Lake was closed Tuesday morning after a jogger found several containers that had been used to make methamphetamine.
    About 6 a.m., the jogger found the containers, which were filled with liquid, and immediately called the sheriff, said Jacki Kelley, spokeswoman for the Jeffco Sheriff’s Office.
    Jeffco’s bomb squad, which was joined by firefighters from the West Metro Fire Department, investigated and determined the liquids were common ingredients in the making of meth.  

  • Elk hunters find human remains near Deckers

    Elk hunters on Saturday found human remains in a remote part of the South Jeffco foothills near Deckers, the Jeffco Sheriff's Office reported. The hunters had to hike out of the area to get cell-phone service and report finding the remains, said sheriff's spokeswoman Jacki Kelley. 

    Kelley said the remains were located miles from any landmark. The Sheriff’s Office used GPS coordinates to pinpoint the area. Kelley said the sheriff couldn't comment on how long the remains had been there.

  • Stalking a good time

    The important thing is not to panic. And to remember that you won’t starve to death. 

    Because you’re surrounded by corn. 

    The Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield has laid out a perplexing course for its corn maze this year, the 14th installment of the popular populist puzzle. The labyrinth is spread out over 8 acres of maize, and hints are sprinkled throughout.

    “Follow the hints; they’re really helpful,” said volunteer Dale Huffner. “Of course, that’s unless you want to get lost in there.”

  • Jeffco seeks dismissal of lawsuit by sheriff’s employees

    Jefferson County has asked a federal court to dismiss a lawsuit filed by a group of Sheriff’s Office employees who claim they are owed back wages and overtime that was promised by the county.

    The Board of County Commissioners and the Sheriff’s Office are both named as defendants in the case. 

  • King Soopers gets half-million-dollar incentive to expand store

    Littleton will provide a $500,000 incentive for the King Soopers at Broadway and Littleton Boulevard to undertake a $20 million renovation and expansion at the current location.

    Dillon Companies Inc., owner of King Soopers, is looking to remake the supermarket, and the city is eager to keep the store and its sales-tax revenue. The $500,000 will come through a reduction in development fees and a sales-tax rebate.