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Today's News

  • Pot debate will keep simmering

    Legal access to marijuana in Colorado seems to be a constantly moving target. As new medical marijuana laws go into effect in our state, a number of other things are coming together as well.

    The Department of Veterans Affairs is considering a more flexible definition of post-traumatic stress disorder at virtually the same time as the state health department is being asked to add PTSD to the list of medical conditions for which medical marijuana could be prescribed. If both these things come to pass, it would liberalize access to medical marijuana for PTSD sufferers.

  • Iwayama Sushi still keeping it raw after 3 years

      Iwayama Sushi owner Lee Alan first brought a taste of Hawaii to South Jeffco three years ago, and he’s temporarily adding a few more island touches to the menu to mark the occasion.

    “We’re going to be celebrating our third anniversary next week. Three full years, done. Time flew by,” Alan said last week. “We have traditional Hawaiian food (this) week,” he added, referring to the eatery’s anniversary April 2.

  • Dakota Ridge grad ready to test her (water) wings

      Dakota Ridge High School graduate Moira McNeil has her sights set on a career in homeland security. And if all goes well, her lips might be sealed.

    “Basically, I want the job that when you ask me what I do, I say, ‘I can’t tell you,’ ” the 18-year-old South Jeffco native said. “That kind of job.”

  • Timely hitting, Daly’s pitching push Evergreen past Rebels

    Down to their last out, it took the Evergreen Cougars three pitches to turn a sure defeat into an improbable victory July 18 at Columbine High School.

  • Foothills golf director charged with assault in domestic dispute

     

     

  • Ballot measures assailed at local gathering

      Colorado would be in more economic trouble than it already is if voters pass the three tax-slashing measures on the November ballot, a political consultant told a group recently at Mount Vernon Country Club.

    Amendment 60 would cancel voter-authorized TABOR tax-limit overrides and require public entities like airports and state colleges to pay property tax. Amendment 61 limits municipal borrowing to 10 percent of real property assessed value, among other things, and Proposition 101 virtually eliminates vehicle fees and telephone taxes.

  • Her hopes are high

      Ashley Bissel is staring at the ceiling, trying to think of butterflies.

    She lies on a platform, her head held motionless by a white mesh mask that looks like a prop from a low-budget sci-fi movie. Technicians in white coats circulate around a sparse room and prepare equipment, as her mother cradles her hand.

    Then the time comes for everyone to leave — everyone except Ashley, who raises her fist. In it is a novelty foam brain, which she gives a pronounced squeeze. The symbolism is lost on no one.

  • Eastwood pleads not guilty by insanity

    Deer Creek Middle School shooting suspect Bruco Eastwood pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity on July 12 in district court to 15 charges against him, including four counts of attempted murder.

    Eastwood, who said little during his arraignment, will be evaluated for at least 45 days at the Colorado Institute for Mental Health in Pueblo. A trial date will be set following a report by the institute.

  • Thayer’s command propels Chatfield

    Jake Thayer will play wherever Chatfield head coach Mike Yansak will put him. Primarily, the rising sophomore will play in the field, be it in the outfield or first base. But the smallest player on the team — he’s only 5-foot-9 and 135 pounds — Thayer will also pitch when he needs to.

  • County bans medical marijuana dispensaries

    Jeffco officials on Tuesday morning approved an outright ban on medical marijuana dispensaries, voting unanimously to keep the businesses out of unincorporated areas of the county.

    The move came weeks after the passage of state legislation that granted autonomy to local governments in either regulating medical marijuana businesses or prohibiting them altogether.