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Today's News

  • Chatfield's magical season ends in Sweet 16

    Andrew St. Germain drove uncontested through the lane and laid the basketball into the hoop with 7.8 seconds left. Then, he and his Chatfield boys basketball teammates painstakingly waited and waited and waited. Time was running out on their season, and there was nothing they could do to save it.

    A season in which the Chargers had won 21 consecutive games, including a 16-0 run through the 5A Jeffco League, was shockingly over as fifth-seeded Legend upset top-seeded Chatfield 51-49 in the Sweet 16 of the 5A state tournament March 6 at Chatfield Senior High School.

  • Chickens and bees all the buzz in Jeffco

    Jeffco is getting ready to have “the talk” about the birds and the bees. 

    This week the county will begin discussing a proposed zoning change that would allow residents to keep chickens and bees in residential-zoned districts. Currently in unincorporated Jeffco, raising chickens and bees is allowed only in agriculturally zoned areas. 

  • County zoning changes put pedestrians first

    In order to encourage a more pedestrian-friendly environment, Jefferson County has created a new set of regulations for mixed residential and commercial developments that are centered on people traveling on foot.

  • Courting community spirit

    Members of every team in the Dakota Ridge Youth Basketball league did more than work up a sweat on the court this year. The kids volunteered on community projects ranging from helping to clean up Water’s Edge Park and Coal Mine Avenue to writing letters to soldiers.

    “The kids are already involved in their community through basketball; the projects help to strengthen this connection as the kids give back and see the positive impact of their service,” said Felicia Randall, community service coordinator for Dakota Ridge. 

  • School board gets briefing on school-finance legislation

    Legislation that would overhaul the way Colorado’s public schools are funded was the main topic during a meeting of the Jeffco school board on Feb. 28.

    The district’s lobbyist at the state legislature, Ed Bowditch, reported on a bill by state Sen. Mike Johnston, D-Denver, that is designed to allocate state funds more equitably among school districts.

    “It’s really too early to fully talk about it because everything (with the bill) is just now taking shape,” Bowditch told the board.

  • Graduation rates rise in Jefferson County high schools

    The Jeffco School District has seen another increase in the number of students graduating from high school on time. 

    For the 2011-12 school year, Jeffco’s high schools saw an on-time graduation rate of 81.4 percent, an increase of 2.3 percent over the previous year and a 3.3 percent increase since 2009.  

    The increase was slightly bigger than the jump the state saw overall. Colorado had a 75.4 percent on-time graduation rate for 2011-12. 

  • Gun control in sights at Everett town hall

    State Rep. Justin Everett, R-District 22, held his first town hall meeting as an elected official, and the tense political climate at the state Capitol was reflected in several contentious exchanges. 

    Several people present, including Everett’s Democratic challenger in last November’s election, Mary Parker, challenged Everett on his opposition to gun-control legislation. The discussion became heated at times, with Everett and the gun-control advocates talking over each other. 

  • Littleton Planning Board approves rezoning for Breckenridge Brewery

    Breckenridge Brewery’s big move to Littleton is one step closer to being a reality. 

    Littleton’s planning board voted 7-0 to approve rezoning of the proposed site of the new brewery, at 6775 and 6855 S. Santa Fe Drive. Currently the 19-acre property is home to two landscaping businesses. 

    One of those businesses, Designs by Sundown, plans to expand on the property as well, adding a new corporate office and more storage. 

  • Stitches in time

    With a fire in the hearth and a pot of tea at their side, three women worked stitch by stitch Saturday to help move along a five-year project at the Littleton Museum’s living 1860s farm. 

    The kaleidoscope-patterned quilt was being created in the same way it would have been more than 150 years ago. Andrea Wilhelm, one of the women gathered around the frame holding the three layers of the quilt together, is the part-time interpreter at the museum. 

  • Gun control’s unintended consequences

    As a student living on Chicago’s south side in the early 1990s, I understood that the beginning of spring brought not only warmer days, but the sound of gunfire at night. Sometimes it would be the single shot from a handgun, and occasionally it would be the “pop-pop-pop” of a semi-automatic weapon.