Today's News

  • Lockout ends at Columbine High; no bomb found

    A lockout ended at Columbine High School about 3:20 p.m. Monday, three hours after the school received a bomb threat.


    Students were allowed to leave the campus for the day after remaining in classrooms while Jeffco deputies searched the grounds with bomb-sniffing dogs.

    The the school was on lockout after the threat report was made at 12:30 p.m., meaning classes continued but no one was allowed in or out of the building.

  • Golden rips draft legislation that paves way for beltway link

    The city of Golden says it would be railroaded by state legislation drafted with Jeffco’s help that would grant eminent domain power to build the controversial Jefferson Parkway.

    The draft bill, which has not yet been introduced in the legislature, was made public April 12 by Golden. The city characterized the document as a secretive means of circumventing the democratic process, but Jeffco officials sang the praises of the proposal, calling it a way to get a much-needed transportation project done.

  • Jeffco to replace roof on Taj Mahal for $1.4 million

    Jefferson County will spend up to $1.4 million to replace the severely damaged roof of Jeffco Courts and Administration and Building in Golden.

    County commissioners approved the expenditure April 3 after Anne Panza, Jeffco construction management manager, described the extent of damage to the roof’s heavy rubber membrane.

    “The membrane was actually ripped off of the roof in some areas,” she said. “Literally, the wind pulled that off.”

    The roof was installed about 20 years ago and had a 15-year warranty.

  • Crews inspecting water flowing into Strontia Springs Reservoir

    Denver Water just finished a cleanup of Strontia Springs Reservoir, but now the company must be alert to a new round of possible contamination from the Lower North Fork Fire.

    The reservoir reopened March 3 after a $17.7 million dredging project that cleaned out sediment and ash that came from tributaries affected by the 2002 Hayman Fire and the 1996 Buffalo Creek Fire.

  • SUV hits, kills jogger on West Hampden frontage road

    An out-of-control SUV struck and killed a man who was jogging Sunday near the LifeSource Adventist Fellowship church along the West Hampden Avenue frontage road.

    Denver police responded about 12:30 p.m. on Easter Sunday, finding a trail of tire tracks that veered off the road, led through a wooden fence and into the back of a home in the 3500 block of South Harlan Street. The jogger was pronounced dead at the scene, and a man found pinned between a wall in his home and the SUV was treated for minor injuries before being released from a local hospital.

  • Neighbors oppose development plan at Kipling and Quincy

    A developer’s plan to build nearly 250 apartments near the federal prison at Kipling and Quincy is drawing the ire of local residents.

    About 150 people attended a community meeting April 3 that the developer held as part of the county’s rezoning process, and many raised concerns about increased traffic and spoiled views of the mountains.

  • West Metro appoints fire chief

    Newly appointed Fire Chief Don Lombardi of West Metro Fire Rescue plans to expand the department’s role in non-emergency health care and citizen safety training.

    On Tuesday, April 3, the district board unanimously voted to hire Lombardi as its next chief. Lombardi has been with West Metro for 21 years and had served as interim fire chief since October 2011, when Chief Douglas McBee retired.

    Lombardi grew up in Littleton and attended the University of Colorado, where he earned his bachelor of science degree.

  • ‘Tommy’ turns arts center into visual, audio feast

    Violent strobes of color, energized dance and a backdrop of renowned psychedelic rock saturate the senses in the Littleton Town Hall Arts Center’s production of “Tommy,” a nearly overwhelming contrast to the title character’s catatonic state.

  • Getting the jump on fitness

    E.J. Boillot keeps jumpers hopping twice a week at Ute Meadows Elementary from late September through July and August for two and half hours a day. “It’s pretty much year-round. In an off-World year, guys will be done around the last of June. We wouldn’t go again until September,” Boillot said. “But with this being a World year, they’ll stay jumping, competing, staying in shape until the 8th of August. Then we’ll start again around the 15th of September.”

  • Reverse-911 glitches fixed, county reports

    Glitches in the emergency notification system that caused a number of homes that were supposed to be evacuated during the Lower North Fork Fire to be passed over for reverse-911 calls have now been fixed, a Jefferson County official said.

    Problems with FirstCall Network, the emergency notification company that Jeffco uses, caused fewer than 120 homes in the evacuation area not to receive the evacuation call, according to Jeff Irvin, executive director of the Jefferson County Emergency Communications Authority.