Today's News

  • Turnovers, offensive miscues trip Eagles

    HIGHLANDS RANCH — As far as measuring sticks go, the Dakota Ridge football team probably couldn’t have asked for a tougher challenge than to face the third-ranked team in 5A to open the 2013 season. And, let it be known: ThunderRidge didn’t show much in the way of mercy on its 4A brethren.
    Grizzlies quarterback Brody Westmoreland was untouchable, going 10-for-10 for 209 yards and two touchdowns, both to Mark Hopper, and Westmoreland added a TD run in ThunderRidge’s 30-7 victory over the Eagles on Aug. 29 at Shea Stadium.

  • Chargers rally for win in opener

    By Craig Harper
    For the Courier
     There’s nothing the coach of a young team wants more in the season opener than to see how his players react to adversity.
    The Chatfield boys soccer team dominated ThunderRidge for the most part in the 2013 home debut Aug. 29, yet trailed 1-0 with just under 25 minutes remaining in second half.
    “That’s when you find out what your team’s about,’’ said Chargers head coach Brock Blume.

  • Level-headed Rebels show patience

    Galen Graham is one of three returning players for the Columbine Rebels. So he’s in a position to set an example for his more inexperienced teammates. The latest lesson was patience.
    Columbine’s No. 1 singles player found himself trailing 3-0 early before winning five consecutive games against Arvada West’s Anthony Partrick. Yet Graham still lost the opening set Aug. 29 at Marker Park in a tiebreaker before rallying for a 6-7 (1), 6-4, 7-6 (3) victory in the Rebels’ 7-0 win.

  • Plan for Chatfield Reservoir expansion moving forward

    The Army Corps of Engineers has released its final plan for the expansion of Chatfield Reservoir, a proposal designed to help meet growing demands for water but one that is still opposed by at least one conservation group.

    The chosen plan, labeled Alternative 3, would raise the water levels by a maximum of 12 feet and increase the maximum storage by 20,600 acre-feet. Some 587 acres of Chatfield State Park, Colorado’s most popular, would be flooded in peak storage years to provide more water for urban and agricultural users on the Front Range.

  • InBloom concerns need attention

    By Paula Noonan
    Jeffco schools Superintendent Cindy Stevenson is traveling across the county to discuss various Jeffco education initiatives. One program, a large information technology pilot project called inBloom, will collect, store and distribute personal student data on off-site Amazon “cloud” servers managed by non-district employees.
    Information will include, at least, student ID number, name, address, test scores, demographic information, grades, assessments and some medical  information.

  • A sunny Sunday

    Sunny soccer weather on Sunday in Littleton followed last Thursday's hailstorn that hit the western portions of South Jeffco.

    In the photo, Doug and Wendy Stroup of Woodland Park sit in the shade while watching their son, Mason, play soccer on Sunday at Cornerstone Park in Littleton.

  • Rezoning approved for apartments

    The City Council has approved a change to residential rezoning for a property in southwest Littleton, clearing the way for a 250-unit apartment complex at Mineral Avenue and South Platte Canyon Road.

    The rezoning for the Meadows at Platte Valley development was approved on a 4-3 vote, with council members Peggy Cole, Jerry Valdes and Bruce Beckman voting no. Rents in the development will run from $1,000 to $1,500.

  • Littleton voters to decide on taxes on marijuana, hotel stays

    Littleton voters will decide in November whether the city can enact a tax on sales of recreational marijuana and on hotel rooms.

    While the City Council has yet to decide if it will allow sales of recreational marijuana, residents will vote on a proposed 3 percent sales tax on pot sales. That tax would be added to the city’s existing sales tax, along with any state tax on recreational marijuana.

  • Council votes to double impact fees on development

    The Littleton City Council has voted to double the fees charged on new development to pay for the increased use of city services that commercial and residential growth generates.

    On a 6-1 vote on Aug. 20, the council approved the new system of impact fees, with Councilman Jim Taylor opposed.

    Impact fees help the city pay for increased use of the fire and police departments, museum, library, and roads as a result of new development.

  • Jeffco Open Space seeks clear goals for next five years

    Jeffco Open Space wants its new master plan to do more than just collect dust.

    The plan, which gets an overhaul every five years, will include a set of benchmarks to help the Open Space Division see if it’s meeting stated goals. Previous master plans have lacked goals and objectives that could be measured, said Jeffco Parks and Open Space Director Tom Hoby.