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Today's News

  • Ken Caryl Middle School teacher profile: Jaye Shomaker

      Life can take people in unexpected directions. Jaye Shomaker knows this well.

    “I was actually a hairdresser,” said the seventh-grade science teacher at Ken Caryl Middle School.

    Prior to venturing into the classroom, Shomaker cut and styled hair — often for teachers.

    “I just became interested in just hearing their stories,” she said.

  • Hartman to serve as county board chair

      County Commissioner Kathy Hartman was elected Tuesday to chair the Board of County Commissioners.

    Commissioner Faye Griffin voted last Tuesday in favor of Hartman, who served in the position prior to former board chair Commissioner Kevin McCasky.

    “Being chairman means you spend an extra 30 minutes signing documents, and you still only have one vote,” Hartman said. “I have plenty to do already, but I think it’s better for staff.”

  • Chargers' upset bid falls short

    There’s a lot of crimson on the Chatfield sweaters for a reason.

    “You know, they play with a lot of heart,” Chargers coach Bradd Markusch said Jan. 8 after Chatfield lost 3-0 at the Edge to Ralston Valley, arguably the best team in the state this season.

    “This is a game that they get up for because the competition is great,” he said. “We just seem to play up to that kind of competition. The guys were really psyched for this game.”

  • Strong relays, good depth lead Chargers to victory

    Haley Lowe is an aquatic sprinter.

    So when the Chatfield junior was sent to the water at the Ridge rec center Jan. 8 to swim the 500-yard freestyle event, which is like asking a drag racer to steer a Winnebago across the country, she didn’t question it or suspect it was any kind of secretive punishment.

    “No, they wanted me to swim it,” Lowe said pragmatically.

    And swim she did. Although she was shooting for a lower time, Lowe still placed second in the event with a time of 6 minutes, 3.13 seconds to help the Chargers defeat Evergreen 171-135.

  • Will a third-party movement emerge?

    As I write this column, I’m looking at an online Denver Post story announcing that my friend and former colleague in the state House, Kathleen Curry, has renounced her affiliation with the Democratic Party and is now officially “independent.” It comes as a surprise only insofar as sitting elected officials rarely leave their parties. That said, Curry, who hails from Gunnison, has always had an independent streak.

  • Wrestlers duel at tourneys

    Most kids like a certain degree of attention. In wrestling, that can be a blessing and a curse.

    “I like it, but it (also) sucks,” Dakota Ridge 103-pound Levi Maes said Jan. 9 at the Eagles’ dual tournament.

    Maes is 17-1 this season, and that kind of record puts him firmly on the radar in Class 5A. That means opponents are sharper and eager to test him.

  • Thieving Eagles heel Huskies

    Curi Yutzy is creating clones at Dakota Ridge.

    In his second season coaching the Eagles, the former prep star and college player has them playing a lot like he used to. Hit the open 3-pointer, stick with the motion offense, jump the passing lanes and move your feet on defense can yield a lot of success.

    “We’re just playing as a team right now,” senior Brandon Wilson said Jan. 5 after the Eagles battered Douglas County for a 73-55 Class 5A nonleague victory.

  • Chargers nearly outdo themselves

    Sports writers love to say dumb things. It’s what we do, and we get paid for it.

    I’m pretty sure most writers don’t do this on purpose, although that’s just a guess.

    Predictions have to made, unanswerable questions have to be answered and mountains have to be made out of mole hills — and hopefully we don’t smell too much like molasses.

  • Ken Caryl Middle School to remain open

    Ken Caryl Middle School apparently will remain open.

    The Jeffco school board gathered for a special meeting Jan. 9 and ultimately decided that closing the school is not a viable option, despite a recommendation from a district committee to shutter the school and send its students to Deer Creek Middle School.

    “That wasn’t a solution anymore,” board member Paula Noonan said of the informal vote to remove the option from consideration.

  • County to survey residents on services

      Jefferson County is spending $24,700 for a resident-survey project that is anticipated to gather about 1,000 responses.

    Beginning this month, 3,000 surveys will be sent to randomly selected homes in the county. Questions are designed to ascertain which county services residents value most and which they value least.