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Today's News

  • Commissioners reject short-term vacation rentals

    The Jeffco commissioners voted 2-1 Tuesday morning against allowing homeowners to rent their homes to vacationers and visitors on a short-term basis.

    The board quickly dispatched an issue that has been a hot subject at numerous meetings since September when the planning department first proposed the idea of changing the zoning regulations.

    Unlike the county commissioners, the planning commission voted 5-2 in favor of allowing short-term rentals, with conditions, at a meeting Dec. 9.

     

  • Looking back at 2009: As it turns 20, the Columbine Courier recalls the year's events in South Jeffco

      2009 was a year of anniversaries.

    Two decades ago a small newspaper opened its doors and became the main source of local news for an unincorporated part of Jefferson County that has come to be known simply as South Jeffco.

  • Colorado's budget: Here come the cuts

    The Denver Post recently reported that “Colorado’s budget shortfall has grown another $40 million, reaching a projected $600.6 million for the fiscal year that ends in June.” This is due in large part to declining tax revenues as a result of bad economic conditions.

    To make matters worse, in the upcoming fiscal year — which starts in August — the budget shortfall is expected to be $1.5 billion. 

    To put those numbers into perspective, the state's operating budget for fiscal 2009-10 is just about $19 billion.

  • Change is great for prep football

    Breaking up is hard to do. But it sure can be fun sometimes.

    Consider the new Class 5A and 4A football landscape after the Colorado High School Activities Association, school administrators and coaches carved up two fields in flux.

    Big-school football will live up to the billing for the next two-year cycle with 52 schools, a nice raise from the previous 45, which meant making the 32-team playoff bracket was a lot like hitting water after falling off a cruise ship.

    The 32-playoff bracket remains for 2010-11 … and that brings us to the give-and-take.

  • Leverage always a player in politics

    It’s disappointing on every level that health care reform, like the stimulus plan before it, will be enacted without bipartisan cooperation. While Democrats have charged Republicans with being obstructionists and Republicans have called Democrats arrogant, the simple fact is that President Obama’s major initiatives will be enacted without Republican support.

  • Rowdy Rebels cling to victory

    Mike McCuaig doesn’t see any stars on the Columbine hockey roster this season.

    Himself included.

    But the Rebels’ goalie and his teammates are trying to corner the market on ‘scrappy.’

    “It’s scrappy, but we get the job done,” McCuaig said. “We scrap, but we’re not ridiculous with it. We try to draw penalties.”

  • Ken Caryl Middle School teacher profile: David Lee

      Physical education teacher David Lee isn’t crazy about cubicles.

    “I couldn’t sit behind a desk and work,” said the third-year teacher at Ken Caryl Middle School.

    The burly coach is far more comfortable under the harsh glow of gymnasium lights.

    “We’re always in here shooting baskets and playing around after school,” Lee said as he tossed a football back and forth with a student.

  • Ken Caryl Middle School teacher profile: Cathy DeLozier

      Cathy DeLozier relocated from Fayetteville, Ark., to be close to her father, who lives in Conifer.

    “We came to be close to him,” she said. DeLozier, who is in her second year as Ken Caryl Middle School’s band teacher, came to Colorado with her son, who attends the school.

    What she found at the school was another kind of family.

  • Ken Caryl Middle School teacher profile: Joni Mattox

      Joni Mattox has something in common with the seventh- and eighth-graders in her classes. Like her young charges who are fond of navigating the vast social networks on Facebook, she embraces the information technology age.

    “Kids live in a technological world, and this is technology-based, which makes it fun for the teacher and the student,” said the Ken Caryl Middle School teacher, whose classes include computer science, computer applications and broadcasting. “I just love teaching.”

  • Lesson Plans

    The sixth-graders in Amy Thomas’ class at Normandy Elementary got a sort of dress rehearsal before their long-awaited graduation to middle school.

    Donned in crisp collared shirts and dresses, students sat anxiously Dec. 16 in groups of three to five at a table draped with red, white and blue paper. They faced a panel of judges, which included their principal, Liz Costello.

    One at a time they explained and defended the U.S. Constitution.