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Today's News

  • Cougars don’t make final grade

    The Evergreen Invitational was back in its former glory Jan. 16.

    Podium glory, however, eluded the home team.

    Due in part to the cancellation of Conifer’s tournament, the annual Evergreen Invitational grew to 21 teams as coach Lane Williams welcomed in some of the teams that were left without a place to wrestle.

    More teams meant more wrestlers for the first time in several years. But it also meant more competition and deeper brackets that almost all had multiple state placers lurking.

  • Student who protested Michelle Obama speech gets $4,000

    A Dakota Ridge High School student who was detained by deputies during a November 2008 speech by Michelle Obama at the school has settled his lawsuit against the sheriff’s office and Jeffco Public Schools.

    Blake Benson, now a senior at the school, is set to receive $2,000 from each of the two agencies. Benson, who was represented by the ACLU, said his First Amendment rights were violated.

  • DiFolco clutch in OT victory

    Danny DiFolco was the picture of Dakota Ridge’s overtime victory over Columbine.

    Before a boisterous crowd, with the lead changing hands faster than federal financial aid and momentum swings that felt like mood swings, DiFolco put his hand on the wall for support outside the locker room.

    “Excited. Overwhelmed,” the junior said. “It was just good to see that hard work finally paid off.”

  • Man pleads guilty to sex assault

    A man charged with breaking into a South Jeffco home in June and sexually assaulting a woman in her 50s pleaded guilty Dec. 4 to charges related to the attack.

    Ryan R. Iliff, 22, pleaded guilty to kidnapping, a class 2 felony; sexual assault, a class 5 felony; and first-degree criminal trespass, also a class 5 felony.

  • Rebels finally beat Chargers

    The Columbine Rebels were due.

    Having never defeated rival Chatfield in hockey, statistically the Rebels’ had to win to sometime. Jan. 14 was that time, but it was more than just the odds evening out, it was a win with style.

    It was like taking the monkey off your back and selling him to the zoo for sweet cash.

  • Rebels, Chargers split in hoops

    In addition to getting past a rival Columbine and dealing with a packed gymnasium, the Chatfield Chargers had to overcome themselves Jan. 13.

    “We were nervous coming out. Big game,” Chatfield guard Kyle Evans said. “But we got it under control in the second half.”

    The Chargers erased — OK, more like scrubbed and bleached — any thoughts of an upset bid as they rolled to a 71-46 victory by outscoring the visiting Rebels 39-23 in the second half.

  • Ken Caryl Middle School teacher profile: Geol Weber

      Teacher Geol Weber is right at home in the trailer park.

    “I absolutely love it,” said Weber, as a loud whine emitted from the furnace in his temp classroom at Ken Caryl Middle School. “I call them the trailer park … If you look underneath, there’s a spot to put wheels.”

    The structures are a separate physical entity from the main school building, which gives them an entirely different feel, he said.

    “Given the choice, I would teach in a temp any day of the week. It seems like a home out here.

  • Rebels ground Eagles

    These are a few of Olivia Leyshock’s favorite things: Beating both local rivals in the span of two days.

    “That’s the best feeling in the world,” the Columbine junior forward said Jan. 15 after the Rebels dropped Dakota Ridge 48-45, two days after defeating Chatfield. “We let them up a little bit, but we got back, and I think just the chemistry really helped us out.”

  • Ken Caryl Middle School teacher profile: Veronica Maes

      The most important part of Veronica Maes’ job might just be taking a few minutes to converse with students. The assistant principal at Ken Caryl Middle School drops into the cafeteria every day with principal Pat Sandos to catch up with kids and see how life is treating them.

    “It’s the highlight of my day,” said Maes, now well into her second year at the school. “The students are used to seeing Pat and I out at lunch every day. We interact with them. We try and make it fun.”

  • Ken Caryl Middle School teacher profile: Kiley Mack

      The process of learning how to be an effective teacher is fresh in the minds of many of the predominantly young faculty at Ken Caryl Middle School.

    With a modest five years of experience, science teacher Kiley Mack is no exception.