.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Colt Canter Community Walk for Caring Connections

    The Colt Canter Community Walk for Caring Connections will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 10 at Columbine Hills Elementary School. Check in/registration is at 9 a.m. and the walk begins at 10 a.m. The non-competitive walk is approximately one mile through the Columbine Hills neighborhood. Concessions, entertainment and bicycle rodeo will be offered at the end of walk. Caring Connections is a program created in 2006 to reach out to Columbine Hills Elementary students and their families in times of challenge such as a death, birth, serious illness/injury, loss of job, etc.

  • Grand Junction police officer found dead in Jeffco

    A Grand Junction police officer accused of sexual assault and burglary was found dead in a Jeffco hotel room Oct. 6.

    Glenn Coyne, 35, was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound in a room at the Days Inn Hotel at 15059 W. Colfax Ave., according to Jeffco sheriff’s spokesman Jim Shires.

    Coyne had recently posted a $250,000 bond to get out of the Mesa County jail. He was being held on suspicion of first-degree sexual assault and first-degree burglary.

  • Dakota Ridge blanks Columbine

    Last year, Columbine routed Dakota Ridge on the Eagles’ home turf.

  • Jeffco sheriff leads effort to allow sick-day ‘donations’

    The Jeffco Sheriff's Office is leading an effort to allow employees to donate unneeded sick time to co-workers who may need it.

    Sheriff Ted Mink said a deputy had used a lot of his sick time while helping his wife through a trying health situation. Not long after that, the deputy was diagnosed with cancer himself, and had little sick time left.

    Mink said the deputy should be fine and his treatment schedule can be managed, but the situation showed the need for a change in policy to let employees with more sick time than they need donate it to others.

  • Correction

    A story in the Oct. 7 issue of the Courier incorrectly stated that private investigators were permitted to question a student at Shaffer Elementary. Although they were allowed to see the girl, they did not actually speak with her.

  • County wants registry for foreclosed properties

    Jeffco Sheriff Ted Mink says the county should have the authority to require banks and other property owners to maintain foreclosed and abandoned properties to help head off crime and preserve property values.

    "With all these foreclosures out there, there's a lot of additional criminal activity," Mink told the county commissioners Sept. 15. "They attract crime, and the neighbors get upset. Some cities have authority to force banks to do something with the properties; counties don't."

  • Jeffco sheriff involved in large pot bust

    The Jeffco Sheriff's Office and the West Metro Drug Task Force bagged another elaborate marijuana grow operation on public land Sept. 29, the third bust of its type in or near unincorporated Jefferson County this summer.

  • Supreme opportunity: State's top court gives Columbine students front-row seat to justice

    Justice may be blind, but Columbine High School students had their eyes opened to the judicial process when the Colorado Supreme Court heard arguments in two cases in the school auditorium on Oct. 1.

    The session was part of Courts in the Community, an educational outreach effort started by the Colorado Supreme Court and Court of Appeals in 1986. The Supreme Court has heard arguments in high schools twice a year ever since.

  • Poor weather forecasts postpone Pumpkin Festival at Botanic Gardens at Chatfield

    Forecasts for poor weather have forced the Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield to postpone the annual pumpkin festival for a week.

    The pumpkin festival has been rescheduled for Oct. 17-18, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    “All the weather forecasting made it look like this weekend was not best weekend to have people come out,” said gardens spokesman Will Jones. “We don’t want people to get caught in mud and snow or whatever else Mother Nature will throw at us.”

  • Camp Invention keeps elementary students thinking during summer

    For the most part, the hallways at Blue Heron Elementary School are exactly as expected during the summer: mostly empty with the occasional custodian working on projects that weren’t possible during the school year.

    But at one end of the school comes a familiar sound: children laughing and talking, and perhaps most importantly, learning.