Today's News

  • D’Evelyn falls short on winning 3A Metro North title

    LAKEWOOD — Evergreen coach Rob Molholm had plenty of restless nights preparing for D’Evelyn senior quarterback Owen Burke.

    “Owen is a heck of a quarterback,” Molholm said “He gave me nightmares all week long. Boy, did he have me stressed.”

    Molholm’s defense was the ultimate cure for his anxiety heading into the showdown against D’Evelyn on Nov. 6 that determined the Class 3A Metro North League champion.

  • Columbine takes care of first-round business

    By Craig Harper — For the Courier

    LAKEWOOD — Having earned a No. 1 seed in the Class 5A football playoffs with a perfect regular season, Columbine couldn’t be blamed if it felt a bit of indignation at drawing Overland as its first-round opponent.

  • Eagles run the table in Plains League

    By Brian Miller — For the Courier

    LAKEWOOD — It had been 11 years since Dakota Ridge’s football team could claim a league championship of its own.

    That’s why last Thursday night’s victory carried an added sweetness to it. The Eagles overcame a bit of a slow start — at least by their standards — by erupting for five touchdowns in the second quarter on their way to a resounding 63-13 victory over Littleton on Nov. 5 at Trailblazer Stadium.

  • Chargers amped up

    LITTLETON — Chatfield’s volleyball team celebrated Nov. 7 after claiming the Class 5A Region 1 title on the Chargers’ home court.

    However, the Chargers likely saved a little bit for a hopeful state championship party this coming Saturday night, Nov. 14, at the Denver Coliseum.

  • Shortwave enthusiast has long reach

    It’s rare when the Israeli-Palestinian conflict reaches Conifer, but it does happen.

    Earlier this year, tense Middle Eastern politics threatened to thwart the efforts of Conifer resident Tom Quinlan to make contact with a “ham” radio operator in every recognized nation.

    The 78-year-old Quinlan, a Vietnam veteran, has been a ham operator for 61 years, ever since his neighbor introduced him to the hobby when he was a teenager growing up in New Jersey. 

  • Columbine students star in a super satire

    Rebels Without Applause, Columbine High’s drama group, is set to premiere “Nooses Off” by Don Zolidis on Thursday in the school’s auditorium.

  • Bandimere possibly looking to add commercial, residential uses in future

    The owners of Bandimere Speedway are seeking a rezoning of their property that would keep the existing use of a racetrack but add residential and commercial uses to about 150 acres along C-470.

    The rezoning, which is in the pre-application process with Jeffco Planning and Zoning, would involve more than 123 acres in unincorporated Jeffco, including the 106.8-acre racetrack property, along with 19.4 acres south of the track in Morrison and 7.1 acres north and east of the track in Lakewood.

  • Commissioners never tire of bike-lane debate

    Jeffco’s county commissioners have delayed a vote — for the third time — on new transportation rules that would require striped bicycle lanes to be added to some roads.

    The commissioners voted Oct. 27 to delay a final vote on the changes amid continued disagreement over the striped bicycle lanes. The amendments were originally presented Sept. 1 and again Sept. 29.

  • D’Evelyn named best public high school in state

    D’Evelyn Junior/Senior High School has been named the best public high school in Colorado for 2015 by the educational research website StartClass.

    The ranking is based on D’Evelyn students’ average performance on a variety of standardized tests, along with other statistical information. SmartClass is operated by Graphiq, a statistical analysis company that works in a variety of fields.

  • Jeffo Open Space lands grant for programs to connect with youths

    The Be Wild, Jeffco coalition of Jeffco Open Space has received a $75,000 grant to encourage youths to experience the outdoors.

    The funding from Great Outdoors Colorado is aimed at creating programs and expanding parks to improve access for young people, said Open Space spokeswoman Thea Rock.

    Many Jeffco youngsters live in areas with gaps in nature connections, Rock said — similar to people who live in “food deserts” that lack readily accessible grocery stores.

    “Maybe there is no park in their neighborhood,” she said.