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Today's News

  • Early run fuels Chargers

    Be careful whom you challenge.

    The Chatfield Chargers girls basketball team found themselves dared to shoot from downtown Feb. 25 by the Littleton Lions, shortly before the Chargers were dared to score inside.

    They answered both challenges with aplomb.

    The seventh-seeded Chargers broke the zone and beat the man defense en route to a comfortable 54-34 victory in the first round of the Class 5A state tournament.

  • Jeffco government salaries

    Jefferson County Government Press Listing For Year 2008

    County Commissioners

    Administrative Specialist II 37163.27

    Commissioners Exec Secretary 63776.90

    Elected Official 63203.00

    Elected Official 87300.00

    Elected Official 63203.00

  • CoHOPE voting structure is no longer fair

    I want to respond to the recent article published in the Courier on Feb. 11, “HOA threatens to pull out of CoHOPE, form another coalition.”

  • Jefferson Economic Council announces board officers, new board members

    The Jefferson Economic Council elected its 2009 board officers in December.

    Kristen Anderson, senior vice president for Wells Fargo, is JEC’s new board chair. Mike McGinnis, a partner with Brownstein Hyatt Farber & Schreck, will serve as vice chair, and Karen Lind, executive director of Elk Valley Public Improvement Corp., will serve as past chair. Mike Partheymuller, vice president of Carma Colorado, will serve as treasurer, and E.F. “Buddy” Douglass Jr., president with FirstBank of Lakewood, was elected board secretary.

  • Eagles help raise breast cancer awareness

    The Dakota Ridge girls basketball team certainly looked pretty in pink, but there was more than just style concerns behind the fashion statement.

    The Eagles wore pink jerseys - both Feb. 21 against Columbine and two days earlier against Bear Creek - as part of Think Pink Cancer Awareness week.

    The uniform change certainly brought good vibes to Dakota Ridge as they won both games while donning the pink jerseys, earning a share of the Class 5A Jefferson County League title in the process.

  • Eagles win home finale in style

    Who wears short shorts? The Dakota Ridge Eagles basketball team does.

    Ahem, that’s the Dakota Ridge Eagles’ boys team.

    “We definitely came out with a little more fun,” senior guard Lenny Canny said.

    And a lot more leg.

    Perhaps it was the increased flexibility of the retro shorts, or just the vibe of getting back to the old-school when fundamentals were not only coached but embraced, but the Eagles were feeling vintage Feb. 18 against Bear Creek.

  • Amendment 54 ruffles feathers among Jeffco officials

    A state constitutional amendment that bars sole-source government contract holders from contributing to political campaigns caused some consternation at the Taj Mahal on Feb. 12, with county elected officials saying the ban is too broad.

    Amendment 54, which was approved by Colorado voters in November 2008, prohibits contractors with more than $100,000 in contracts with any government entity from contributing to political candidates, political action committees or political parties. It also applies to the immediate family of the contractor.

  • Legislation on sewer rates on hold

    A bill born from the conflict between the city of Littleton and South Jeffco water and sanitation districts is dead in the water, as the parties continue to negotiate. But the legislation still could resurface.

  • Weitzel wrestles to third-place finish

    DENVER — Cody Weitzel has wrestled numerous times in tournaments much bigger and arguably more illustrious than the Class 5A state wrestling championships at the Pepsi Center.

    But that didn’t stop the butterflies from coming to the Columbine freshman.

    “I’ve been to a lot of really big national tournaments and I thought I wasn’t going to be affected,” Weitzel said.

    Weitzel overcame his nerves, rebounding from one defeat to place third in the 103-pound weight class on Feb. 21.

  • Careful: COBRA coverage can bite you

    It has happened. You were or are going to be laid off. Your soon-to-be-last employer has informed you that you can select COBRA and pay the full 100 percent (plus 2 percent administration) of the premium. You think, “Great, I am covered.”

    However, you find out 45 to 60 days later that your premium is two or three times higher than what you previously contributed. The latter is the norm. I have seen singles and families with $600 and $1,200 monthly premiums, respectively. There go your layoff-package dollars.