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Today's News

  • Deputies will help check census workers

    It's that time of the decade again — the federal government is sending out an army of workers to begin taking the 2010 census.

    Workers will start by conducting an address survey to make sure every address in America is accounted for so surveys can be mailed to those homes in 2010.

    And so, the Jefferson County Sheriff's Office is trying to head off calls about strange people cruising neighborhoods or trying to get into gated communities.

  • Principal at Morrison school arrested on suspicion of sex assault

    A principal at a Christian school in Morrison has been arrested on suspicion of sexual assault on a child.

    Daniel Charles Brock, 35, of Littleton has been under investigation since February when a staff member at Silver State Christian School contacted the Morrison Police Department with concerns about Brock’s relationship with one of the students.

    Investigators believe Brock is on administrative leave from the school.

    Brock will be held without bond until his advisement on April 13 at 10 a.m.

  • On his long road back, Sean Graves has been a help and an inspiration to others

    Friends of Sean Graves are quick to say that he’ll do anything to help others — except give them the shirt off his back.

    To hide the scars from bullets that struck him during the Columbine High shootings 10 years ago, Graves always keeps his shirt on. He doesn’t want others to see the scars and make pre-judgments. He doesn’t want them to know that he almost bled to death.

    But most of all, Graves doesn’t want people to connect him to the Columbine massacre and be tempted to ask questions about the worst day of his life.

  • Reviewing the lessons of Columbine

    By Hannah Hayes

    When I see parents waiting at a bus stop, I can remember the multitude of feelings I had when my child came home from school on the day of the Columbine shootings. The illusion of schools as safe havens was irrevocably shattered, as were so many lives. We are all Columbine.

  • How to avoid coyote conflicts

    Coyotes are active in Jefferson County and the metro area. The following is adapted from Colorado Division of Wildlife literature.

    Coyotes on the Front Range?

    Coyotes are extremely adaptable and can thrive in urban areas. From downtown Denver to the smallest suburb, coyotes are not new to residential communities. They can and will be found in any neighborhood that provides their basic needs — food, water, shelter and space.

     

    Why are they here?

  • Eagles continue to roll

    Attention Wal-Mart shoppers: all men’s underwear is on sale, most flatscreen televisions are discounted 15 percent and baseballs are now available in the outdoor garden center. Thank you.

    Blame Dave Whitaker for that last one. The Dakota Ridge catcher hit a ball so hard April 15 it rocketed over the fence in center field, caught fire as it re-entered the atmosphere and landed next to a stack of fertilizer in the parking lot across the street.

    Or something like that.

  • Columbine's Thomas signs with Hastings

    When Columbine’s Aimee Thomas committed to playing volleyball at Hastings College, coach Ron Alexander said he probably gave his neighbors a good scare.

    After hearing the good news, Alexander went out to his backyard and let out an excited yell.

    Obviously, he was happy with Thomas’s decision.

    “We’re excited to have her,” Alexander said. “Aimee’s a wonderful match for our program.”

  • Chargers brave elements, topple Lobos

    LAKEWOOD — The Chatfield girls lacrosse team put forth a performance April 16 that would’ve made a postman grin.

    Despite bitter cold temperatures and a downpour of rain that intensified deeper into the contest, the Chargers made sure to make all of their deliveries.

    Against a gritty Conifer team that battled for most of the first half, Chatfield blew a close game opening, scoring 11 unanswered goals, leading to an eventual 20-10 victory at Trailblazer Stadium.

  • Kopp bill aims to save businesses $10 million a year

    Colorado businesses will save roughly $10 million a year if the state eliminates a 3 percent worker-compensation surcharge, says South Jeffco’s state senator.

    Republican Sen. Mike Kopp, who is pushing the legislation, says the fee is unnecessary, and his bill to eliminate it cruised through the Senate and is now in the House.

  • Community orchard coming to fruition

    The community orchard that started as a seed of hope in Shirl Smith’s heart is coming to fruition.

    Four planter beds and rows of wooden stakes crisscross a vacant field just southeast of Waterstone Community Church on West Bowles Avenue. More than 130 trees will be planted within the next week or two, transforming the field into a patch of life and hope.