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Today's News

  • The lessons to learn from a down economy

    The other day, a friend told me he believes there’s a good chance our kids’ generation will face the same kind of Depression-era challenges our grandparents did. I don’t know whether that’s true. I sure hope not.

    If we had our way, of course, our kids would never face economic hardship. Difficult times lead to deferred dreams, missed opportunities, strained relationships and, in some cases, poverty. There’s nothing good about job losses and a stagnant market.  

  • Kopp to host ‘virtual’ town hall meetings

    State Sen. Mike Kopp is hoping to get better connected to his sprawling South Jeffco district with the help of the Internet.

    But Kopp isn’t planning to start posting videos on YouTube. Instead, he will kick off a series of “virtual” town hall meetings with his constituents. With the help of Gotomeeting.com, which is designed for online business meetings, Kopp will meet online with up to 15 constituents to discuss timely legislative topics.

  • The Rocky will be missed

    With the closing of the Rocky Mountain News, it is a great credit to the employees at the paper that they went out with class. The final edition was a retrospective of the paper’s 150 years in Colorado, full of insight and stories that serve to remind all of us what we’ve lost.

    This is an institution that spanned multiple generations of Coloradans. The first Rocky included an advertisement for “brokers and dealers in exchange and gold dust”; the last pitched the T-Mobile G1, a cell phone with Internet connectivity.

  • Home rule could give Jeffco residents stronger voice

    Jefferson County has the largest unincorporated urban area in the United States; the area known as “South Jeffco” alone contains more than 100,000 residents. If it were to incorporate as a city, it would be among the largest cities in the state.

    When the Colorado Constitution was enacted in 1876, such an urbanized unincorporated area was never imagined. Consequently, the structure of county government in our state makes it difficult for counties to enact ordinances to regulate graffiti and other urban problems.

  • Commissioners reject increases in development fees

    A proposal by county staff to raise some fees paid by developers was shot down March 3 by the county commissioners.

    Tim Carl, Jeffco’s director of development and transportation, proposed raising certain fees from $100 to $450 over the next three years. Under Carl’s plan, some fees would have increased 25 percent each year through 2011, when they would have been frozen for three years. Starting in 2014, the fees would have been adjusted every three years in line with the Consumer Price Index.

  • Heritage tops Chatfield in extra innings

    The Chatfield Chargers are learning what it’s like to be the hunted.

    Fresh off a solid victory over highly-touted Arapahoe, the Chargers could not keep up with Heritage on March 11 and suffered a wild 11-7 loss in 10 innings.

    The Chargers (2-1) battled back from deficits of 2-0, 4-3 and 7-4 before the Eagles (2-2), who were winless entering the game, finally dropped the hammer with four runs in the top of the 10th.

  • The fighting spirit: Front Range Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu owner takes on new business challenge

    In feudal Japan, a class of warriors known as the samurai developed methods for combating opponents who were armed or wearing armor. The fighting style that emerged, now known as jiu-jitsu, has evolved over time into several disciplines for sport and self-defense.

  • Jeffco takes steps to speed processing of food-stamp applications

    Jefferson County is taking steps to more quickly process food stamp applications, after the county was cited as leading the state in failing to process the applications within the federally required 30 days.

    Lynnae Flora, acting director of Jeffco’s community assistance division, said more of the division’s employees are working overtime in an effort to more quickly process the applications. The division’s workers are also getting more training, she said.

  • Chargers take Lambkins' best shot, cruise to win

    Stephanie Rowe got slugged in the face March 10 and was none too happy about it.

    Moving through the midfield in Chatfield’s Class 5A nonleague match against Fort Collins, Rowe took a hand to the grill and was dropped. Sure, the referee awarded the senior a foul, but that wasn’t taking away Rowe’s indignation.

    “I just wanted to get back at them,” Rowe said.

  • Chargers ready for challenge

    The Chatfield boys lacrosse team burst onto the scene a year ago.

    As a first-year program, the Chargers immediately thrust themselves into elite company, knocking off rival Columbine and reaching the Class 5A state quarterfinals.

    This year, expectations around the program remain high, despite losing a few senior leaders. While players like Max Erickson are gone, Greg Kelsic, Nick Nedeau, Mitch Erickson and James Sharp are all back, giving the Chargers plenty of options in the midfield and on the attack.