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Today's News

  • Saturation patrol

    On Sept. 17, 2005, Jamey Ober died in a single-car accident.

    Ober, a 37-year-old Pro Stock driver, lived in Littleton and lost his life on northbound C-470 just north of the Morrison Road exit.

    A little more than three years later, a motorist was arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence at almost exactly the same spot where Ober lost his life.

  • School board must consider when, how to return to voters

    It’s been an interesting few years as it relates to general consensus about when to put school mill levy overrides and bond issues on ballots. Historically, lower voter turnout benefited these questions because teachers and parents were the more motivated voters. When those motivated supporters made up the largest possible percentage of the vote, the measures stood the best chances of winning.

  • Rebels get revenge, bounce Panthers

    ARVADA — The recipe for success has always been simple for Columbine.

    Run the ball with power.

    Play lights-out defense.

    The Rebels did both Nov. 14 in their rematch with Pomona in the Class 5A quarterfinals, grinding out a 23-8 victory in the process. The No. 5 Rebels (11-1) advance to the semifinals and will face No. 9 Cherry Creek (10-2) Nov. 22 at 1 p.m. at the Stutler Bowl.

    The quarterfinal rematch between the two Jefferson County rivals was, at least for Columbine, a stark contrast to the initial encounter.

  • Melton makes Eagles run

    LAKEWOOD — Picture this: A workhorse running back.

    The kid has got to be fast, right? Durable. Tough. Have a real nose for the end zone. Get you those tough yards between the tackles. When times are rough – and they always are at some point in the playoffs – you have to be able to hitch your offense to him and ride his legs to victory.

    That describes Eagles running back Andrew Melton perfectly, even if the senior doesn’t always look the part.

  • Defense rises to the occasion

    ARVADA — Nathan Wiggins wasn’t really sure what happened with 8 minutes, 43 seconds remaining in the fourth quarter.

    The Pomona Panthers were trying to pick on him at the North Area Athletic Complex as they trailed the Columbine Rebels 23-8. The home team was going for a home run and Wiggins was their prey.

    Or not.

  • Summers, Kerr heading back to state House

    State Reps. Ken Summers and Jim Kerr, both Republicans, retained their seats in the state House in the Nov. 4 election.

    Summers was challenged by Lakewood Democrat Camille Ryckman, a former teacher and a current stay-at-home mom who is active in the local PTA. Kerr faced a challenge from a familiar foe, Littleton Democrat Tom Dittemore, who has run against him twice.

    "I'm feeling good," Summers said Nov. 7. "I'm pleased with the outcome, and it's exciting to have the opportunity to serve in the next session." Ryckman could not be reached for comment.

  • A lesson in free speech

    Michelle Obama's visit to Dakota Ridge High School on Nov. 3 was memorable for many reasons. But the Benson family will recall the day mainly for their battle with the Jeffco school district over free speech.

    During the election-eve appearance by the wife of Democratic candidate Barack Obama, 17-year-old junior Blake Benson and a group of friends made signs in support of Republicans John McCain and Sarah Palin, as well as signs that said "Nobama." The small group mounted their protest on the front steps of the school.

  • Griffin joins McCasky, Hartman on commission

    The new Jefferson County commissioner won't have to move far in January.

    Faye Griffin, Jeffco's Republican treasurer, won a close race in District 1 against term-limited state Sen. Sue Windels, an Arvada Democrat.

    "I was pleased I won," Griffin said. "That's always pretty neat."

    Griffin said she's been attending budget hearings since her election victory. The 2009 budget will be tough for the commissioners, and Griffin will have to get up to speed quickly.

  • Two former Jeffco administrators sue, allege age discrimination

    Two former Jefferson County employees are suing County Administrator Jim Moore, alleging that they were fired because of their ages.

    Judy Goebel, the county's director of human resources from April 2006 to April 2007, and Jere Bower, director of support services from February 2006 to May 2007, allege that Moore fired them based on their age. Goebel was 58 when she was fired, and Bower was 54.

  • Governor announces plan to deal with beetle-kill trees

    On Nov. 12, Gov. Bill Ritter announced plans to deal with the epidemic of Colorado trees killed by bark beetles, while at the same time giving money to local communities and stimulate economic activity.

    The Healthy Forests/Vibrant Communities Act of 2009 will be introduced in the coming legislative session and will include a bundle of bills to accomplish those goals. If passed, the measures would be funded with $5.5 million in severance tax revenues, which are paid by energy companies.