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Today's News

  • Chargers make quick work of Eagles

    There’s going to be times when the youthful Chatfield volleyball team shows its inexperience.

    There’s also going to be instances when the Chargers flash glimpses of talent, that once refined, could return the Chargers back to the top of the Class 5A Jefferson County League Standings.

  • Local veterinarian treats bobcat hit by car

    A bobcat that was hit by a car on C-470 the morning of Sept. 23 should make a full recovery, said the doctor who performed three hours of surgery on the animal.

    Dr. Dan Brod, the doctor who treated the 8-month-old female at Deer Creek Animal Hospital in South Jeffco, said the surgery went well, but the young feline will need some rest and recovery time.

    "If the cat does way too much too soon, that would be bad," Brod said. "The cat is semi-confined, and we're taking our time."

  • Chatfield takes it to Columbine

    Parker Lewis got caught watching the scoreboards.

    It was hard to blame him.

    With Lewis and his Chatfield teammates making short work of their rivalry match against Columbine, it seemed at like a race for who was going to be done first.

    While that honor might have fallen to Chatfield No. 2 singles player Jensen Teague, the Chargers were happy with the 6-1 victory over the Rebels on Sept. 18 at the Ken-Caryl Ranch House.

  • Officials urge Coloradans to vote early

    County commissioners, county clerks and even the governor are urging people to either vote by mail or vote early this year, citing an unusually long ballot and a projected record turnout.

    "We've had a lot of activity here in the last couple of weeks from both sides of the presidential campaign, with both Sen. Obama and Gov. Palin visiting Colorado," Gov. Bill Ritter said at a news conference Sept. 16. He said that Colorado is one of the few swing states in the national election. "It is important as a swing state that every vote count."

  • Bright lights, big politics: Jeffco, a swing county in a swing state, is critical to presidential campaigns

    In the wake of visits from Democratic presidential nominee Barack Obama and Republican V.P. hopeful Sarah Palin, Jefferson County is adjusting to its new role in the national political spotlight.

    But the pundits who analyze political races for a living aren't surprised by the attention Jeffco is getting.

  • Jeffco deputies endorse Bane for commissioner

    A group representing nearly 300 Jefferson County sheriff’s deputies and sheriff's office employees is throwing its support behind Jason Bane in the District 2 county commission race.

  • McCasky, Bane trade barbs at candidate forum

    Jeffco Commissioner Kevin McCasky took most of the heat Sept. 15 in the first forum for the five county commission candidates.

    Republican McCasky, the only incumbent, faces two challengers in District 2 in the Nov. 4 election: Democrat Jason Bane and Scott Zulauf of the Green Party. Jeffco Treasurer Faye Griffin, a Republican, and state Sen. Sue Windels, a Democrat, are battling for the District 1 commission seat, vying to replace Jim Congrove, who decided not to seek a second term.

  • Eagles overcome weather, Rams

    It’s a good thing that softball players don’t melt in the rain.

    In a drizzle which turned into a downpour Sept. 11, the Dakota Ridge Eagles defeated the Green Mountain Rams 7-1 in a game which never saw the end of the gray and dreary weather. The temperature hovered in the 50s and the rain just got heavier and heavier.

  • Jeffco ponies up another $930,000 for '08 fuel costs

    The Jefferson County commissioners had to shift more than $930,000 from a contingency fund to pay for fuel for the rest of 2008.

    "I don't anticipate it is going to get any better," said Buck Benke, the county's director of fleet services.

    More than half of the money — $545,330 — will go to the fleet services fund, and the remaining $385,000 will go to the patrol fund for law enforcement vehicles.

  • Amendments 46, 48 raise difficult questions

    Hannah Hayes