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Today's News

  • Stratton, Chargers looking to earn respect

    Sam Stratton can still recall the moment vividly.

    Midway through his freshman year, Stratton was thrust into the starting quarterback position at Chatfield Senior High School. It certainly was a move he wasn’t expecting.

    “I didn’t think I’d be starting until my junior year,” Stratton says now. “Luckily I got in and coach (Bret) McGatlin put me in to get experience.”

  • Chargers' defense could be real deal

    Football coaches typically don’t expect perfection in the season opener.

    They are well aware heading into that first game that mistakes are going to be made. They just hope those mistakes aren’t game-enders.

    After Chatfield’s 24-10 thumping of cross-town rival Dakota Ridge on Aug. 28 at Jefferson County Stadium in a nonleague game, Chargers coach Bret McGatlin was critical of his offense, which turned the ball over three times.

  • Spond breaking the mold

    Danny Spond doesn’t fit the mold of a Columbine quarterback. He’s much too big for that.

    At 6-feet-3, 218 pounds, Spond would be a prototype at just about any other school that doesn’t run on third-and-long and worship the beauty of the belly option.

    When asked the last time he had a quarterback that size, longtime Rebels coach Andy Lowry was blunt.

    “Never.”

    But then again, the job description – lining up under center for the most dominant Class 5A football program over the past decade – has never been solely about size.

  • Chargers run over Eagles

    LAKEWOOD — The Chatfield and Dakota Ridge football rivalry needed five years to schedule a tiebreaker game.

    Dakota Ridge may want to wait another five years before playing the Chargers again.

    The Chargersdominated the line of scrimmage to break off big plays and disrupt anything the Eagles tried to muster as they cruised to a 24-10 nonleague season-opening, cross-classification victory Aug. 28.

  • Off-road policing: 'Resident deputies' live in the remote areas where they work

    When Jefferson County sheriff's Deputies Mike Sensano and Ronnie Newman head to work, they know they have a lot of backup.

    Not so much from their fellow deputies — who are often 30 to 40 minutes away— but from residents of the remote and rugged communities where they live and work.

    "We are a part of the community," said Sensano, a gruff Hawaiian with the calloused hands of a ranch hand. "And the community is part of us."

  • Salazar says Jeffco voters will support Obama

    First-term Democratic U.S. Sen. Ken Salazar believes Jeffco voters will support Barack Obama in the presidential election this fall because he can relate to many middle-class issues.

  • Gift from one local angel touches many

    Dolores Wood believes in angels.

    "There's angels all over the house," Wood said with a gentle smile, pointing to the various glass figurines arranged around the living room of her South Jeffco home.

    But Wood recently encountered an angel outside her home — a stranger who paid for more than $200 in medications needed for her daughter Trudy's cancer treatment.

  • Noonan brought populist approach to DNC

    South Jeffco resident Paula Noonan was thrilled to cast her vote for Barack Obama at the Democratic National Convention. But Noonan believed that her duties as a delegate went much further.

  • Accident kills Littleton man

    Bradley J. Miller, 24, of Littleton died about 10:30 a.m. Aug. 27 when his car was broadsided by a truck at South Simms Street and West Bowles Avenue.

    Miller was stopped at a red light east on West Bowles, and police said he pulled his car into the intersection while the light was still red into the path of a Dodge Ram truck driven by Christopher Dalton, 20, of Littleton.

    Miller was pronounced dead at the scene. Krystle Rankin, 25, of Fort Collins was in the car with Miller and sustained serious injuries. She was taken to Swedish Hospital.

  • Software takes on the hard job of planning road work

    To maintain county roads each year, the Jeffco Road and Bridge Department burns through 114,000 tons of asphalt and 650,000 gallons of diesel fuel — on a network of roads that adds up to 2,860 lane-miles.

    Add to that the soaring costs of fuel and asphalt and the tight times faced by the county budget, and the human mind boggles at finding the most cost-efficient ways to plug the potholes.