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Today's News

  • Angling your way to summer fun

    Comedian Steven Wright once said, "There’s a fine line between fishing and standing on the shore like an idiot."

    With summertime in full swing and the water levels of local creeks and rivers running at volumes rarely seen, the desire to get on shore with a rod and a reel is probably nibbling at every angler.

    Here’s how – hopefully – not to be an idiot.

    Where to go?

  • Landowner scraps doggie day-care idea

    The Firehouse Animal Health Center has written off the option of building an indoor day-care or boarding kennel next to the new veterinary hospital at 12255 W. Bowles Ave., near Bowles and C-470.

    “We are taking the boarding, grooming and day-care thing completely off the table,” said Greg Waldbaum, CEO of Firehouse Animal Centers, a Denver-based chain with five hospitals that was founded in October 2004.

  • Gardens pulls amphitheater project from public process

    The Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield informed Jefferson County on June 3 that it will no longer submit plans to modify and expand its amphitheater to a public site-approval process.

  • Separate library district put on hold — for now

    A nearly two-year effort by the Jefferson County Public Library to split from the county and form its own district came to an end June 17 when the county commissioners voted 2-1 against the proposal.

    "We're very, very disappointed," said Keith Grebe, chair of the Jefferson County Public Library's board of trustees. "We felt the case we presented was overwhelming in our favor." He said the commissioners had some misunderstandings, and the trustees and library staff will "get together and decide plan B."

  • SHERIFF'S CALLS

    Rub-a-dub-dub …

  • Legislators should read the constitution, too

    I remember Michael McConnell, my constitutional law professor at the University of Chicago, opening a textbook with a picture of the members of the Supreme Court on the inside cover. “What’s wrong with this?” he asked.

    At first blush, it makes sense that a book on the Constitution would have a picture of the highest judges in the land. But to McConnell, the photo represented a fundamental misunderstanding about the constitution: namely, only courts have the ability to read and interpret our greatest law.

  • Hot spring for Dakota grad

    When it comes to baseball, Chad Jacobsen is on the path back to home.

    The 2004 Dakota Ridge graduate parlayed his selection as Division II player of the year at the University of South Carolina-Aiken into getting selected June 6 by the Colorado Rockies in the 18th round of the MLB draft.

    Jacobsen’s diamond days began in Littleton, then went to Sterling’s Northeastern Junior College before he made his mark in the Peach Belt Conference.

  • Exempla may move out of The Peak

    The Exempla Family and Occupational Medicine clinic at The Peak Community and Wellness Center may be on its way out.

    Yannick LeRolland, director of IT services for Foothills Park & Recreation District, said a deal may be in the works to let Exempla vacate the space it occupies in The Peak in exchange for forgiveness of nearly $50,000 Foothills owes Exempla.

  • Foes seek injunction against Mount Morrison TV tower

    Canyon Area Residents for the Environment has asked Jefferson County District Court for an injunction to prevent construction of a 135-foot horizontal, high-definition TV antenna array on top of Mount Morrison.

    The issues are separate but similar to the dispute surrounding the construction of the digital TV tower on Lookout Mountain, which was stalled until Congress got involved and overruled local courts in 2006.

  • Mom launches war on drug that killed her son

    The week before he took the six or seven Ecstasy tablets that killed him, Tony “Toaster” Trujillo, 16, had been invited to enroll in an Advanced Placement English class.

    A sophomore at Columbine High School, Tony Trujillo was a handsome kid with scores of friends and an irresistible sense of humor. Everyone knew him as “Toaster,” a variation on an earlier nickname, “the Tonester.”