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Today's News

  • Driver involved in accident that killed deputy pleads guilty

    The driver whose vehicle struck and killed Jeffco sheriff’s Sgt. David Baldwin pleaded guilty June 9 to vehicular homicide. 

    Kenneth Hosch, 83, of Golden could face two to six years in prison. Hosch is currently free on $10,000 bond while he awaits sentencing on Aug. 29.

    The accident occurred just after 10 a.m. Jan. 26 when Hosch passed several cars on Colorado 93 north of West 64th Parkway. Hosch’s vehicle reportedly continued to travel in the opposite lane for about 1,500 feet after passing the cars. 

  • Board majority must reveal vision

    Maybe they just got tired of being called the new conservative majority.

  • The legacy of freedom

    Tanya Hayes clutched a dry-cleaning bag holding an old green U.S. Army uniform as she scanned the crowd at the Salute to the Greatest Generation-70th Anniversary of D-Day on June 6 at Littleton's World War II Memorial. A smaller bag pinned to the jacket held an assortment of Army medals. 

  • Jeffco board approves lower pay for new superintendent

    After heated debate and public comment, the Jeffco Board of Education approved a contract for its new superintendent at last Thursday’s regular business meeting, lowering the base salary $60,000 from the salary advertised for the position.

    If Daniel McMinimee signs the three-year contract, he will be paid an annual base salary of $220,000, reimbursed $20,000 for retirement benefits and be eligible for up to $40,000 in performance-based pay. 

  • Littleton makes first move to ban retail pot stores

    Littleton City Council took the first step to permanently ban retail marijuana stores within city limits, much to the dismay of a medical marijuana store owner in the city. 

    On a 4-3 vote, the council approved an ordinance banning retail marijuana sales on first reading during its meeting on June 3. The ordinance’s second reading will be July 1, and the meeting will include a presentation by city staff and public comment before a final vote.  

  • Redevelopment moves forward despite challenge

    As Littleton is poised to study four areas of the city for possible redevelopment, a former Littleton mayor has issues with the city continuing to use what he calls a failed model of redevelopment that previously cost the city millions of dollars. 

    At the beginning of the year, the council directed its urban renewal authority, Littleton Investing in Tomorrow or LIFT, to identify areas in the city for potential redevelopment. Since then, LIFT has focused on four areas of the city: Broadway Boulevard, Columbine Square, Littleton Boulevard and Santa Fe Drive. 

  • Pipe bands bring Celtic culture to Colorado

    The melodious bellow of bagpipes and the steady tapping of drums heralded the first concert of the annual Summer Concert Series at the Littleton Museum on Wednesday.

    Despite the rain, the Denver and District Pipe Band — comprised of almost 70 bagpipers, drummers and dancers — performed traditional and modern takes on Celtic marches, jigs and reels for 300 attendees.

    Sponsored by the Friends of the Littleton Library and Museum, the Summer Concert Series has been free to the public for more than 25 years. 

  • Chatfield swimming beach reopened after E. coli levels drop

    Chatfield State Park’s swimming beach has reopened after being closed for two days last week when high levels of the E. coli bacteria were discovered in the water. 

    On the morning of June 3, Colorado Parks and Wildlife closed thebeach after a water test showed E. coli levels just above the allowed limit of 235 organisms per 100 milliliters of water. The swimming beach was closed as soon as the testes were completed. 

    By late afternoon June 4, bacteria levels had decreased well below the allowed limit and the beach reopened.

  • School board rejects tentative contract with teachers

    The Jeffco school board last Thursday rejected a tentative teachers contract with the Jefferson County Education Association, much to the dismay of association leaders.

    Board members Ken Witt, John Newkirk and Julie Williams voted against the agreement because, while it would have granted pay raises to teachers rated “effective” or “highly effective,” it would have also provided raises to teachers rated as “partially effective.” Teachers rated “ineffective” would not have gotten raises. 

  • Jeffco commissioners urged to take over for Maximus

    There’s a strong push for counties across Colorado to take back processing some Medicaid applications from a private company that’s had a difficult time meeting time and quality guarantees.

    More than 40 heads of county human services departments indicated they’d like their county commissioners to approve taking over processing Medicaid medical claims from Maximus, a private company contracted by the state, said Gini Pingenot, policy and research supervisor at Colorado Counties Inc. The group met during the Colorado Counties Inc. conference last week.