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Columns

  • The time has come for leadership

    Last week, I sat down for coffee with a recent college graduate. The young man, whom I’ll call “K,” worked his way through ROTC, took a commission as a second lieutenant in the Army, and now serves in an Army engineer company.
    K is the son of immigrants, a first-generation American. He’s a student of American history, especially the founding era. And he understands as well as anyone I know the principles that animate the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. What’s more, he believes in those principles to the core of his being.

  • Words can set the caged bird free

    By Anushka Anastasia Solomon

  • Hopefuls draw lines in the sand

  • Reconciliation key to big solutions

    In a recent radio interview, former secretary of state Henry Kissinger made an interesting point about how polarized our politics have become. I’m paraphrasing here, but Kissinger’s idea is essentially that positive changes in society are achieved only through moments of reconciliation, not conflict. It seems clear he views the partisan environment as a major obstacle to the continued success of America.
    So how can we get to a point of reconciliation? And are we so polarized that reconciliation is no longer possible?

  • The importance of being pleasant

    I was recently at an awards ceremony where a local business executive was honored. In describing his philosophy about hiring employees, he noted that his first test is always to find pleasant people. That rang true with me, but I’d never heard anyone say it before.
    It made me wonder: Is pleasantness the most underrated human trait?

  • Indirect results of direct governing

  • Front-runners, step to the rear

    Chris Romer joined a fairly exclusive club last week. Along with Dale Tooley, Norm Early and Ari Zavaras, he’s now one of the can’t-miss front-runners for Denver mayor who fell to lesser-known opponents each of the last four times the office was truly up for grabs.

  • Did freedom or government come first?

    I recently overheard a conversation that went something like this: “Where does the right to free speech come from?” “The right to free speech,” came the reply, “was given to us by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.”
    Is that accurate? Would our founders have agreed with that formulation? Take a closer look at the language of the First amendment itself: “Congress shall make no law … abridging the freedom of speech.”

  • Spend now, or spend more later

    When I first started working, some of the best advice I ever got was, “Don’t let the urgent get in the way of the important.” Over the years, that idiom has helped me to step back and think about long-term priorities, immediate needs and how they should be balanced and prioritized.

  • Desperately seeking legitimacy

    If marijuana makes you giggle, it’s easy to have a good laugh at the plethora of dispensaries on seemingly every street corner in certain Denver neighborhoods. Talking with two patients who have benefited greatly from marijuana edibles made me straighten up and take notice.