.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • The politics of the power play

    In the waning hours of the legislative session earlier this month, leadership in the Colorado House of Representatives used procedural delaying tactics to kill a civil-unions bill that otherwise had the votes to pass. In a special session less than a week later, the same bill was assigned to a different committee, resulting in it being killed a second time — again, when it had the votes to pass the whole House.

  • Civil discourse: a horse is a horse

    As work in the state House of Representatives ground to a halt on the second to last night of the legislative session last week to ensure that no vote would be taken on legislation to create civil unions, I found myself reflecting on the role my hometown of Steamboat Springs played in the debate on same-sex unions way back in 1975.

  • Let’s try to keep politics in its place

    As we enter the most intense period of the American political cycle — Ppresidential election season — it’s worth reminding ourselves that not everything is political. This may sound obvious enough, but lately the line between politics and everything else has become blurred.
    It all starts with our insatiable appetite for all things political. Car bumpers blare opinions in ever-more-shrill tones. News outlets have drifted away from factual reporting and now rely heavily on the expression of opinion, most of it raw and partisan.

  • Teaching students the wrong lesson

  • A tax hike by any other name …

    I always make it a practice to ask my Metro State journalism students to explain what a mill levy is, because few things are more central to covering governments than understanding how taxing entities get money from the public.
    Usually, the students look at me as if I’m speaking in an obscure Klingon dialect: A mill? A levy? What are those, and what do they have to do with government funding? These are typically intelligent, well-informed students, and they have not the slightest idea what I’m going on about.

  • Reporter saw the best and worst of Jefferson County

    After a 12-hour day spent making bone grafts in October 2009, I was in a small locker room changing out of a pair of sweat-soaked long-sleeve scrubs. The day, exhausting, had been routine until I sat down on a stainless-steel bench to check the single message on my phone left by the man who is now my editor, Doug Bell.
    Since no one was around to enforce my self-congratulatory inhibitions, I jumped up and did a little dance, a moment to which I happily confess but remain glad no one else had to witness.

  • Make your voice heard on wildfires

    Several years ago, when I was still a state legislator, I carried a bill to provide tax breaks for volunteer firefighters to offset the costs of their safety equipment. These volunteers, who are on the front lines of wildfire response in most mountain areas, must often buy their own boots, helmet, jackets and other personal protective equipment. A tax credit would allow more volunteers to serve their communities, helping all citizens in the process.

  • I’ll always be a Tim Tebow fan

    Yes, I understand. Peyton Manning is a four-time MVP, a Super Bowl winner, and a sure-fire first-ballot Hall of Famer. He commands a game like nobody else. Even when he’s just at 75 percent, he’s still better than everybody else. And by all accounts, he’s an even better man off the field than on it. It’s great to have him in Denver.
    But I’m still going to miss Tim Tebow.

  • Technology giving stalkers many new tools

    By Ted Mink

  • Campaign season is upon us

    As you have no doubt concluded from the many recent GOP presidential debates, it’s an election year. And it’s a watershed year for Colorado politics, in many ways.
    Jefferson County voters will be casting ballots in races that range from county commissioner to U.S. Congress. And nearly all the voters in our coverage areas find themselves electing U.S. House members and state legislators in redrawn districts that will be game-changers for candidates and voters alike.