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Today's Opinions

  • Don’t forget to say thank you

    The every-other-week nature of this column sometimes makes it difficult to be timely, so let me apologize in advance for the lateness of these Memorial Day sentiments.  But I hope late is better than never to offer gratitude to those who have given everything for our country, and those who continue to make sacrifices day in and day out.

  • Grads will leave an empty place behind

    “As soon as you walk out of our door … everything’s going to change, and it won’t change back. Not to the way it is now. I am so happy for you … and I am so proud. … Sometimes I want my sweet little (child) back. I’m going to miss you a lot.”
    — from the TV show “Glee”

  • The politics of the power play

    In the waning hours of the legislative session earlier this month, leadership in the Colorado House of Representatives used procedural delaying tactics to kill a civil-unions bill that otherwise had the votes to pass. In a special session less than a week later, the same bill was assigned to a different committee, resulting in it being killed a second time — again, when it had the votes to pass the whole House.

  • Our Readers Write

    What happened to manners?
    Editor:
    What a lazy society we’ve become. We’re so interested in our own little world, whatever suits us, that we don’t think ahead to how our laziness and inconsideration affect others. Decency and manners have gone out the window.

  • Civil discourse: a horse is a horse

    As work in the state House of Representatives ground to a halt on the second to last night of the legislative session last week to ensure that no vote would be taken on legislation to create civil unions, I found myself reflecting on the role my hometown of Steamboat Springs played in the debate on same-sex unions way back in 1975.

  • Our Readers Write

    A letter from Thomas Jefferson to Jefferson County
    Editor:

  • Let’s try to keep politics in its place

    As we enter the most intense period of the American political cycle — Ppresidential election season — it’s worth reminding ourselves that not everything is political. This may sound obvious enough, but lately the line between politics and everything else has become blurred.
    It all starts with our insatiable appetite for all things political. Car bumpers blare opinions in ever-more-shrill tones. News outlets have drifted away from factual reporting and now rely heavily on the expression of opinion, most of it raw and partisan.

  • Our Readers Write

    City of Golden is right to oppose development of parkway
    Editor: