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Today's Opinions

  • Our Readers Write

    Trickle-down theory doesn’t hold water
    Editor:

  • The importance of being pleasant

    I was recently at an awards ceremony where a local business executive was honored. In describing his philosophy about hiring employees, he noted that his first test is always to find pleasant people. That rang true with me, but I’d never heard anyone say it before.
    It made me wonder: Is pleasantness the most underrated human trait?

  • Our Readers Write

    County’s reasons for scrapping audit panel are lame
    Editor:
    I’ve been following the Jeffco audit issue for several months now, and after reading your June 15 front-page article “Commissioners scrap county audit panel,” I thought it would be a good time to add my two cents.

  • Indirect results of direct governing

  • Our Readers Write

    Compassion, responsible government go hand-in-hand
    Editor:

  • Front-runners, step to the rear

    Chris Romer joined a fairly exclusive club last week. Along with Dale Tooley, Norm Early and Ari Zavaras, he’s now one of the can’t-miss front-runners for Denver mayor who fell to lesser-known opponents each of the last four times the office was truly up for grabs.

  • Our Readers Write

    Death of bin Laden provides opportunity for our nation
    Editor:
    With the recent demise of one Osama bin Laden, would this not be an ideal time for our president to declare: “Mission accomplished! I’m bringing the troops home; we have far bigger concerns to address here!”?
    Mr. President: “Carpe Diem!”
    Russell W. Haas
    Golden

    Be bear aware when camping
    Editor:

  • Did freedom or government come first?

    I recently overheard a conversation that went something like this: “Where does the right to free speech come from?” “The right to free speech,” came the reply, “was given to us by the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.”
    Is that accurate? Would our founders have agreed with that formulation? Take a closer look at the language of the First amendment itself: “Congress shall make no law … abridging the freedom of speech.”