.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Labor unions: relevant or ruinous?

    By Hannah Hayes

    A friend recently shared that her grandfather was a union member, and then she said something that really struck me: “That was back when unions were a good thing.” Her comment speaks to the success of management in its long-lived campaign to create a negative image for unions.

  • Echoes of past, hope for the future

    Journalists are captivated by anniversaries, and that’s one of our biggest failings. The tendency, after an arbitrary number of years, is to find morals and endings, to tie up the loose strings of a tragedy and pronounce the community ready to move on.

  • County working to build healthy Head Start

    The article in the Canyon and Columbine couriers on April 22 may have given the impression that Jefferson County’s social services fund would leave the Head Start program short $650,000 and in violation of federal law.

  • The strangest budget year yet -- really

    Have you ever noticed how every year is the most amazing something in people’s memories? We’ve never had a drier winter. We’ve never had a hotter summer. That’s the best team we’ve ever had. I’ve never seen someone behave so badly. It’s usually not true. Time has a tendency of evening things out.

  • County will reconsider bonus policy

    Bonuses have been in the news a lot lately, and the news has not been positive. Most recently, Jeffco’s employee bonus policy has come under scrutiny.

    I do not think bonuses are appropriate for public employees, and I said so two years ago. But my proposal to eliminate bonuses did not get the support of my fellow commissioners. They argued that government should be run more like a business, and bonuses are a legitimate method of acknowledging and rewarding exceptional performance in business.

  • How should higher ed be funded?

    Hannah Hayes

    I loved Kelly’s passionate plea for schools in her Columbine column. It’s ironic and predictably perfect that she would follow it up by advocating for a $300 million cut in higher education this week. Education is the single most important force in creating the kind of citizenry that America needs. An indication that you value schools would be a willingness to pay for them, as our state surely must.

  • Cell phone ban nothing but grandstanding

    Recently, my former colleagues in the state House passed a bill that would make it illegal to drive while talking on a cell phone, unless you’re using a hands-free device. By the looks of it, the ban will pass the Senate and be signed by the governor.

    At first glance, this seems a reasonable law. But it’s also totally redundant. In fact, under current law, a person who causes an accident while talking on a cell phone can be prosecuted under no fewer than four criminal statutes.

  • Our Readers Write

    Witwer relies on discredited assumptions

    Editor:

    Rob Witwer’s column is an example of what Al Gore pointed out in “An Inconvenient Truth,” that the popular press doesn’t hesitate to level the playing field between pure ideology and scientific theory, presenting the former as the equal to the latter, in complete disregard of evidence, logic, and a broad consensus among experts.