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Today's Opinions

  • Sharing the road works for bikes and cars

    Do Colorado roads sometimes feel like the Wild, Wild West? A new law seeks safer roads and happy trails for all, here in Jeffco and throughout Colorado.

    Gov. Bill Ritter signed into law Senate Bill 148, the Bicycle Safety Bill, clarifying our state’s rules on how bicycles and motor vehicles share public roads. Sponsors Sen. Greg Brophy, R-Wray, and Rep. Michael Merrifield, D-Manitou Springs, worked with fellow legislators to find common-sense approaches that enhance road safety for everyone. The new law takes effect on Aug. 5.

  • Goaltender inspired beyond the game

    In Denver area ice hockey circles, he was known simply as “the goalie in the wheelchair.”

    Kyle Stubbs and his chair stopped pucks for a lot of teams over the years: the Warthogs, the Grinders, Berserk, Spitfire, and Chimney Full of Squirrels, to name a few. And he frustrated the shooters of other teams too numerous to list.

    On a recent Saturday, many of us who played with and against Kyle gathered at the Promenade in Westminster to say goodbye and to remember a man who refused to accept the limits that life imposed.

  • ‘Halfway to Heaven’ a perfect summer read

    Two years ago, I got a call from my friend Mark Obmascik. Mark, a former Denver Post reporter turned author, was working on a new book, and he needed help.

    His previous book, called “The Big Year,” was about hard-core birders who tried to accumulate as many species sightings as they could in 365 days. It was quirky and entertaining, and compelling enough to get me into birding myself.

  • Budget highlights party differences

    They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder. SB 228 certainly proves that adage in Colorado. When Gov. Bill Ritter signed the bill last week, he characterized the bill as taking a big step toward modernizing Colorado’s state budget. At the same time, Josh Penry, the Senate minority leader and a possible challenger to Ritter in next year’s governor’s race, called the bill “California-style taxing and spending.”

  • Life is precious, in all its forms

    Last night, as I opened the lid of the aquarium to put in food, a little hatchet fish jumped out. Apparently he hit the lid hard enough to knock himself out. I tried to help him regain consciousness as best I could. Yet despite my efforts, there was no skill or technology at my disposal that could save him.

  • Does Walmart contribute to poverty?

    By Hannah Hayes

    There was a time when you could market a product based on its inherent value. Lately, low price has become the predominant criteria in the marketplace. The world’s largest corporation, Walmart, shares mightily in the creation of that business ethic. The company is even benefiting during these tough economic times as it draws people in with low prices, while many say it’s Walmart that created the difficulties in the first place.

  • Colorado LifeTrak: Protecting those who wander

    Zach is a 6-year-old boy from north Jeffco whose autism makes him prone to wander. A few years ago, Zach walked away from his backyard and through the neighborhood. A neighbor found him and called police, who helped reunite him with his panicked family.

    Zach's family worried that if Zach were to wander away again, he might be lost for hours, or get hurt. Maybe next time he wouldn't encounter a Good Samaritan. Despite their renewed vigilance, they wanted extra reassurance that Zach could be found if he walked away from the house, a store or a park.

  • Obama’s first pick for top court

    By Hannah Hayes

    “Stop, In the Name of Love” Oops. Wrong Supremes. Stop? If you think it oh-oh-ver, isn’t this what winning the presidential election is all about? With the largest number of votes ever, President Obama has earned the privilege of nominating a Supreme Court justice.