.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • By Stephanie Alderton, Staff Writer

    Treasure hunters of all ages went looking for the past on Littleton’s historic Main Street last Saturday.

    Historic Littleton Inc. kicked off its third annual scavenger hunt at 10 a.m. to the music of a barbershop quartet outside the Town Hall Arts Center. Each group of contestants received a ballot containing clues and a map to the 15 local businesses where the answers could be found. 

  • The Summerset Festival was back at full strength last weekend as attendees soaked up the sunny weather that was missing last year. 

    The festival, which draws about 30,000 people to Clement Park during the three-day event, was canceled by wet weather in 2013 for the first time in its 30-year history. Yet even the potential for snow on Friday, opening day, wasn’t enough to dampen the excitement. 

  • Some like it crisp and others prefer their pig more pliable, but in the spirit of bringing home the bacon, downtown Littleton put pork on parade Saturday.

    “Who doesn’t love bacon? It’s delicious,” said Aaron Ehrhardt of Littleton.

    Ehrhardt and his wife, Tyleen, made the short walk to join hundreds celebrating side meat at the Alferd Packer Bacon Party. The event featured live music, drinks and several food trucks that served up the guest of honor.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, Staff Writer

    There was plenty of running, splashing and roughhousing Saturday at the Ken-Caryl Ranch House pool, but the lifeguard didn’t seem to mind. 

  • The lot behind The Ridge Recreation Center was empty at the start of the day on Aug. 9. By sunset, a new playground had materialized in the space.

    More than 250 volunteers from the Columbine Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including about a dozen kids handing out lemonade and water, made quick work of building the playground for the Foothills Park and Recreation District.

    The community effort was the fourth time the church has helped build a playground for the district in one day, said event organizer Kerry Schaper.

  • A motley crew mingled in Bega Park on Saturday as they waited for a firetruck to lead them down Littleton Boulevard. Several fairies took laps on their bicycles, while a couple of cowboys mounted stick horses and moseyed along.

    The Littleton Firefighters Children’s Parade drew a large crowd of pint-size participants Saturday morning. The event, part of Western Welcome Week, was the warm-up act for the Grande Parade later in the day.

    Yet for participants in the kids’ parade, it was the highlight of the day.

  • Colorado Supporting Our Troops, a charity that supports members of the armed forces serving overseas, is literally helping soldiers shine a light on their work.

    The group, which held a fund-raising event at Clement Park on Saturday, recently sent an $800 spotlight to an Army unit serving in Afghanistan. The light, which replaced one destroyed in a mortar attack, is used by trucks on night patrol to search for roadside bombs, said Lainey Hamrick.

    The fund-raiser featured a fitness boot camp and silent auction.

  • Ken-Caryl Ranch celebrated its 100th birthday with a little old-time flair.

    The Ken-Caryl Ranch Historical Society hosted a birthday party Aug. 9 to celebrate the community’s founding, when John Charles Shaffer bought the original 2,660 acres of land on Oct. 17, 1914. Shaffer named the ranch after his two sons, Kent and Carroll.

    The event was a throwback to the community’s founding, with a barbershop quartet, banjos and a vintage fashion show featuring clothes from the turn of the 20th century.

  • The price of a frozen turkey at the neighborhood grocery store doesn't add up for 15-year-old Evan Lim of Littleton.

    It costs Lim, a 4-H participant, about $70 for each of the turkeys he’s raised from chicks and then processed — a giant jump from the supermarket price.

    “It makes you wonder what they’re feeding them,” Lim said. “It’s really important for my family to know where our food comes from.”

  • The train derailment was fraught with the potential for mayhem, as pizza and Ninja Turtles sailed through the air at Bemis Library.

    But it does help to have a contingent of dedicated hobbyists on hand to pick up the pieces — and snap them back together.

    The library on Saturday hosted the creations of the Denver Lego Users’ Group and the Colorado/Wyoming Lego Users’ Group, whose members had spent hours the night before assembling a massive Lego city, complete with operating trains, a working carousel, Batman and at least a few aliens. 

  • Several a-fungi-anados gathered at Flying J Ranch last Friday morning to learn about mushrooms in the mountain area of Jefferson County.

    “We have between 2,000 and 3,000 mushroom species just in this area,” said Mary Beth Carpenter, a volunteer with the Lookout Mountain Nature Center.

    About a dozen people showed up for “Beyond Pizza: What Everyone Should Know About Mushrooms.” Carpenter led the talk on families of fungus.

  • The mountain air in Morrision last weekend was full of the sounds of polka, the clanking of beer steins and the smell of fresh-made bratwurst.

    Denver’s Biergarten Festival, sponsored by the Colorado chapter of the German American Chamber of Commerce, brought the feel of a Munich Biergarten to the foothills as a way to help celebrate German culture, said chamber President Fred Beisser. The chamber’s goal is to promote business and cultural ties between Colorado and Germany.

  • The sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers on foreign battlefields during World War II and the support from Americans back home are the focus of a new exhibit at the Littleton Museum.

    “Littleton Goes to War: 1941-1945,” a year-long exhibit that opened July 5, not only traces the arc of the global conflict but also shows the major roles that places like Littleton played, said museum director Tim Nimz.

  • Littleton kids got the inside scoop on bubbles recently — by getting inside them.

    Bubble Lady Nancy Winkler brought her "bubble-ology" presentation to Bemis Public Library on July 1, demonstrating how to make unbreakable bubbles, educational bubbles — and how to put a youngster inside a bubble. 

    Winkler uses everything from granny curlers, pasta strainers, fly swatters and coat hangers to create her bubbles, eliciting “oohs and aahs” from the youngsters, who don't always manage to stay seated during the performance.

  • A sea of blankets and lawn chairs covered Clement Park as thousands waited for the night sky to be illuminated with fireworks on July 3. 

    The Foothills Park and Recreation District’s Red, White & You celebration drew a massive crowd looking to start the July Fourth holiday early. Despite some evening rain showers, the event drew an estimated 30,000-35,000 people. 

    The evening featured live music, kids games, food vendors and a 15-minute-long fireworks display that capped the night’s entertainment. 

  • The sound of a fire truck’s siren has drawn countless children to press their faces against the window to catch a glimpse of a big red truck flying by. 

    “It’s so neat to see the kids faces as they ride the truck,” said Steve Guardado, the organizer of the Mile High Hook and Ladder Club’s Fire Parade and Muster. “And it’s not just kids — 90-year-old grandpas want to ride up top. They’re grinning from ear to ear.”

  • Even a hailstorm couldn’t stop the party in Littleton. 

    An early-afternoon storm on Saturday left hail, branches and leaves covering the streets hours before more than 1,000 people were to descend on downtown for the Main Street Block Party. 

    Yet the mess Mother Nature left was no match for the downtown merchants, said Greg Reinke, president of the Historic Downtown Littleton Merchants Association. 

  • The rain left South Jeffco just in time for residents to go out and get wet.

    A handful of people were out enjoying the sun and water at the Columbine West Pool this weekend. The pool, operated by the Foothill Parks and Rec District, opened for the summer on Saturday.

    “This is our first time coming to this pool,” said Carrie Mulholland. “It’s hot, and we don’t have a pool in our neighborhood, so this is perfect.”

    Mo Korbel, Mulholland’s friend, said she takes her kids to the pool frequently during the summer.

  • Reading can be its own reward. But it doesn’t hurt to win a prize for reading a book.

    The Jeffco Public Library kicked off its Summer Reading Club on Sunday with celebrations across the county. The club gives readers from preschool age through adults a chance to win prizes for finishing books and other activities, said Bethany Candelaria, the library’s marketing manager. 

  • Colorado is home to one of the most diverse butterfly populations in the country, and the beauty of that variety is on full display this summer in South Jeffco. 

    The Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield opened the new Butterflies at Chatfield exhibit last weekend, a collaborative effort between the gardens and the Butterfly Pavilion. The exhibit is one of a kind in Colorado, featuring only native plants and butterfly species, said Mary Ann Hamilton, the pavilion’s vice president for science and conservation.