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Features

  • Today’s high school freshmen weren’t yet born on Sept. 11, 2001. The youngsters climbed anyway.

    Many who attended Sunday weren’t in New York, Washington or Pennsylvania on that horrific day, and don’t know anyone who was. And still they climbed.

    Some participants weren’t firefighters and didn’t have any connection to first responders. And yet they climbed as well.

  • The Audubon Nature Center at Chatfield State Park hosted a “100 Years for Birds” event on a recent Sunday in honor of the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

    The event offered information booths and displays on various species of migratory birds; a live raptor presentation by Nature’s Educators; a rubber-duck scavenger hunt for the youngsters; and nature walks led by master birders.

  • A South Jeffco golfer was treated last month to an unexpected trip to Baltusrol Golf Club for the PGA Championship.

    But the journey to Springfield, N.J., for the season’s final major didn’t begin on a qualifying course or as an item on a personal bucket list. It started with a news story.

  • When the summer sun is scorching and the pool is open for one more day, everyone and their dog come out for a swim. Literally.

    Deer Creek Pool hosted its annual Doggy Dip on a recent Sunday evening, and more pools in the South Jeffco area were scheduled to host similar events before closing for the season.

    Pet owners of all ages brought canines of varying sizes to enjoy the water, the fun and the community.

  • Every time Karen Brown watched coverage of the Ironman World Championship in Kona, Hawaii, she was moved to tears. She saw Julie Moss win the silver medal in February 1982, and dreamed of competing herself.

    “Watching them, I thought, ‘Oh, they’re professional athletes, and I only run for recreation,’ ” Brown said. “I thought I could never do it.”

  • By Ramsey Scott, For the Courier

    Last weekend’s Jeffco Fair and Festival at the fairgrounds in Golden celebrated the county’s agricultural roots, and also offered a generous helping of music, art and entertainment.

    And pie. Lots of pie.

  • Eager kids lined up to have their faces painted at the Ken-Caryl Ranch House on Aug. 3, just one of many activities at the Music a la Mode summer celebration.

    Sitting on a blue chair, 3-year-old Jude Duran squinted as paint met skin. Meanwhile, Adam Duran, Jude’s father, held his son’s head still as a clown painted Jude’s face to look like Spiderman. After the process was finished, Jude looked into a mirror with a smile of satisfaction.

  • By Ramsey Scott, For the Times

    The Inter-Canyon Fire Protection District hoped that by firing up the grills this past weekend it would be able to muster some new firefighters. 

  • The Jeffco Sheriff’s Office has had two photographs selected as finalists in the National Sheriffs’ Association’s 2016 Photo Contest.

    An image by Jeffco Sgt. Charlie Simmons of Deputy John Butler patrolling Highway 93 against a cloudy, mountainside sunset is one of the five finalists in the “patrol” category. And Specialist Stephen Willder’s photo of Deputy James Tucker at the Jeffco jail during a night shift in February was in the top five in “jail / corrections.”

  • At the intersection of Bowles and Kipling, a sign near the stoplights reads, “Ninja Training, next to Ace Hardware.” Around the corner from the hardware store, people walk through a door and find themselves at the top of a flight of stairs covered with artwork of samurai. After a short trip down, visitors might feel as if they’ve walked into a ninja movie.

  • It was 1999 when South Jeffco resident Suzanne Braden first came face to face with a giant panda.

    Braden was in China visiting the Wolong National Nature Reserve, which today encompasses nearly 500,000 acres and is home to about 150 giant pandas. The reserve also consists of four panda bases, including the China Conservation Research Center for the Giant Panda, where veterinarians and conservationists raise pandas and panda cubs in captivity.

  • Never was there a story of more woe, than this of Juliet and her Romeo — this time featuring cell phones, city skyline backdrops, line dancing and contemporary musical interludes.

    The Foothills Park & Recreation District’s Theatre Company presented performances of “Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet” July 22-23 at Clement Park, and will host two more performances this Friday and Saturday at 7 p.m.

  • England was in the throes of World War II when London resident Mary Barry went into labor with her first child.

    She remembers many of the roads were closed because of the bombing. Shells exploded all around the ambulance as it meandered its way to the hospital.

    On an earlier occasion, Barry recalled how she and her husband, Jim, were caught off guard by a sudden barrage that was so intense they were unable to escape to shelter. Hunkered down in the street, Mary asked Jim if he thought they would survive until morning.

  • It’s a peaceful Saturday morning at Clement Park. Groups of runners are preparing for a 5K. Ducks and geese are walking through the grass. Locals are running along the path, some with dogs at their sides.

    In the midst of all this, a small group begins a game of dodgeball. Even as the players are knocked out, they run behind enemy lines and do a set of 10 pushups. And once they have a ball in hand, they can attempt to hit their opponents, who now have enemy fire coming from both sides.

  • "Oh yeah. I like ice cream. Oh yeah. I like ice cream.”

    Boom. Boom. Tap, tap, tap, tap. Boom. Boom. Tap, tap, tap, tap.

    A circle of 30 people, each with a percussion instrument in hand, sound out the rhythm. Then, progressively, it evolves.

    Boom. Boom. Tap, tap. Tap, boom, boom, tap.

    Each person beats out a different rhythm, a different sound, or a different timbre. Yet they all complement one another, weaving in and out of the collective beat.

  • English priest Saint Edmund Campion once described the Irish people as “religious, frank, amorous … very glorious … inclined with passing hospitality,” Dennis Gallagher, professor emeritus at Regis University, told attendees at the 22nd annual Colorado Irish Festival.

  • When 13 adults are playing a land-based version of “Sharks and Minnows” on a Monday evening at Clement Park, it leads many passers-by to raise an eyebrow.

    But Camp Gladiator participants don’t seem to mind — and, to some degree, they actually encourage the curiosity.

    “I’ve had several people walk up and join us for a workout,” said Tyler Kennedy, Camp Gladiator’s primary trainer for the Littleton area. “People want to be outside, having fun.”

  • By Kevin M. Smith, For the Courier

    Unlike some geocaches, GeoWoodstock was easy to find.

    The annual event was held at the Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield Farms on Sunday and brought thousands of people from across the country and globe to visit vendors, attend workshops and find some hidden treasures. 

  • Leave for work at 6 a.m. Turn onto the road. Drop down into a lower gear to get up the hill. Push the pedal down. Now the other one. Breathe in. Breathe out.

    The first mile takes more than five minutes. The 19 more to the office will be much the same.

    Thousands of Coloradans had this experience on their way to work June 22. But rather than sitting in traffic jams, they were biking to their jobs.

  • A Harris’s hawk flew above a packed house from one handler to another Sunday at the second annual Father’s Day Falcon Fest at the Audubon Nature Center at Chatfield State Park. Dads, moms and their kids watched in awe as five birds of prey were presented by the founder of HawkQuest, Kin Quitugua.