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Features

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    Figure-skating students of all ages brought a cool take on the Christmas spirit to The Edge Ice Arena’s annual holiday show.

    The show is a way for students from the Figure Skating Academy to show off their hard work to family and friends. This year’s “Skates and Snowflakes” event, held Saturday afternoon, had the largest number of participants ever, with 85 performers.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    Virgil “Bud” Harold became both the newest and oldest member of American Legion Post 103 during an annual banquet recently.

  • The Smithtonians Handbell Choir knows how to ring in the holidays.

    In what has become an annual tradition, the choir performed a collection of yule tunes before a packed Bemis Library in Littleton on Sunday. The choir will bring its show back to town on Sunday, Dec. 14, when it performs during the Littleton Museum’s Holiday’s Evening event.

  • Scores of people participated in a “pinecone ceremony” and farolito lighting to mark the holiday season at The Fort restaurant in Morrison on Sunday under snowy skies.

    Visitors wrote a name or names on a piece of paper of loved ones they want to remember during the holidays and slipped the paper into a pinecone. The pinecones then were tossed into a campfire built in the central courtyard of the restaurant, the messages carried into the sky by the flames.

  • Despite a rapidly approaching Christmas Eve deadline, Santa Claus found a little time for his annual drive down Littleton’s Main Street on Friday.

    Kris Kringle’s appearance was part of Littleton’s Candlelight Walk and Tree Lighting. The holiday celebration, in its 31st year, raised money for Interfaith Community Services and collected toys for the Arapahoe Santa Claus Shop charity.

  • For some, Black Friday is all about finding the best deal on a new flat screen. But for the hundreds who packed Foothills Animal Shelter on Friday, the day was all about finding a new furry friend. And a good deal.

    The shelter featured adoption specials on the days before and after Thanksgiving, hoping to place as many pets as possible. More than 64 animals found forever homes during the two days, said Jennifer Strickland, spokeswoman for the shelter. By Friday afternoon, only two dogs remained available for adoption.

  • Some 29 kids were officially adopted into 22 families on Saturday at the Jeffco courthouse, and every child had a unique and often poignant history that carried him to that eventful day.

    But as the new families left the building, they started a new journey together from a joyful place.

    Hundreds gathered to celebrate those adoptions on National Adoption Day through Jeffco’s Human Services Department.

    Temporary becomes permanent

  • Littleton’s new Aging Well Resource Center is designed as a one-stop shop for an aging population looking for answers in such areas as transportation and health insurance. 

    The center opened in Bemis Library in October; while the city provides transportation services for its senior population with the Omnibus and Shopping Cart programs, Littleton, like many municipalities, doesn’t have a dedicated human services department as county governments do. 

  • “Yucks!” blended with yucks as the students probed the stomach contents of the dogfish sharks they were dissecting.

    “I found a claw,” said one student, as he waved miniature pincers in the air.

    “I found a fish,” another student said as she held high a half-digested fish body.

  • Frigid temperatures didn't deter more than 100 people from celebrating Veterans Day in Littleton on Tuesday. 

    The crowd gathered at the city’s World War II memorial in Ketring Park to honor veterans from Littleton and beyond. And while the temperatures hovered in the teens during the ceremony, it didn’t put a chill on the emotional crowd. 

  • New digs have been found for a colony of prairie dogs whose habitat was lost as a result of a land sale.

    The animals were on parcels owned by the Foothills Park and Recreation District on the northwest and northeast corners of South Wadsworth Boulevard and West Coal Mine Avenue. The northwest parcel was sold to 24 Hour Capital Ventures LLC for $1.165 million and is set to be developed into a medical center. The northeast parcel is currently on the market.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    After dark last Friday, Bemis Library became a monster-infested maze through which a few unlucky golf clubs were doomed to navigate.

  • By Stephanie Alderton, For the Courier

    A group of students is making Mackintosh Academy’s Littleton campus a sunnier place.

  • That first sip of apple cider, savored in the middle of a pumpkin patch, signals for many the arrival of autumn. 

    The hunt for the perfect pumpkin to carve and a bumpy ride behind a horse-drawn wagon also are seasonal traditions. And at Littleton’s Harvest Festival on Saturday at the Littleton Museum, traditions as colorful as fall leaves were enjoyed by young and old.

    For the past decade, Carol Montgomery has brought  her granddaughters to the festival, and this year Katie, 12, and Lilly, 10, enjoyed the autumnal offerings as much as ever.

  • The owners of row after row of motorcycles parked behind Columbine High School didn’t know one another. Yet they all knew why they were at the school on a Sunday morning clad in leather, jeans and bandanas.

    More than a thousand bikers made the 45-mile ride Sunday morning from Columbine High to Platte Canyon High for the ninth Emily’s Parade to honor victims of school violence. The event is named for Emily Keyes, the 16-year-old student shot and killed in 2006 during a hostage situation at Platte Canyon High School. 

  • For Inter-Canyon Fire Chief Randy Simpson, Sept. 20 was a day of reflection as his department celebrated 60 years of providing fire, medical and emergency services to the community. 

    “I feel honored today,” Simpson said. “This department started out with just a few guys who thought we needed a fire department up here. Now it’s a sophisticated department with volunteers and equipment.”

  • Thirty-seven immigrants from across the world stood in the Littleton City Council chambers, surrounded by their friends and families. They raised their right hands and pledged loyalty to their new country. 

    When the ceremony ended Sept. 17, the 37 immigrants had been replaced with 37 U.S. citizens.

    The story of America is the story of the immigrants who come here to start a new life, saying goodbye to homes and past lives in the ultimate gamble on a new beginning. 

  • On a day when the skies are clear and the winds calm, a small, tight-knit community descends on an empty field in Chatfield State Park and ascends to new heights. 

    In the early-morning light on Sept. 20, members of the Colorado Balloon Club unloaded their equipment, unfurled their balloons and attached their baskets. Soon, those left on the ground watched as the balloons and their passengers slowly floated away. 

  • By Stephanie Alderton, Staff Writer

    Treasure hunters of all ages went looking for the past on Littleton’s historic Main Street last Saturday.

    Historic Littleton Inc. kicked off its third annual scavenger hunt at 10 a.m. to the music of a barbershop quartet outside the Town Hall Arts Center. Each group of contestants received a ballot containing clues and a map to the 15 local businesses where the answers could be found. 

  • The Summerset Festival was back at full strength last weekend as attendees soaked up the sunny weather that was missing last year. 

    The festival, which draws about 30,000 people to Clement Park during the three-day event, was canceled by wet weather in 2013 for the first time in its 30-year history. Yet even the potential for snow on Friday, opening day, wasn’t enough to dampen the excitement.