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Features

  • When 13 adults are playing a land-based version of “Sharks and Minnows” on a Monday evening at Clement Park, it leads many passers-by to raise an eyebrow.

    But Camp Gladiator participants don’t seem to mind — and, to some degree, they actually encourage the curiosity.

    “I’ve had several people walk up and join us for a workout,” said Tyler Kennedy, Camp Gladiator’s primary trainer for the Littleton area. “People want to be outside, having fun.”

  • Leave for work at 6 a.m. Turn onto the road. Drop down into a lower gear to get up the hill. Push the pedal down. Now the other one. Breathe in. Breathe out.

    The first mile takes more than five minutes. The 19 more to the office will be much the same.

    Thousands of Coloradans had this experience on their way to work June 22. But rather than sitting in traffic jams, they were biking to their jobs.

  • A Harris’s hawk flew above a packed house from one handler to another Sunday at the second annual Father’s Day Falcon Fest at the Audubon Nature Center at Chatfield State Park. Dads, moms and their kids watched in awe as five birds of prey were presented by the founder of HawkQuest, Kin Quitugua.

  • Memorial Day is cloudy and cool, with a bit of wind out of the north. People on the boardwalk along Main Street in Evergreen watch as a motorcycle tools by every few minutes. Sometimes the bike is accompanied by others; sometimes it’s alone; sometimes it’s playing music through a speaker; sometimes it’s moving to the tune of its own melodious engine.

  • The rain and lightning held off long enough for more than 800 people to enjoy a Thursday night out at Clement Park listening to folk duo Moors & McCumber. The pair played as part of the Foothills Park & Recreation District’s Summer Entertainment Series.

  • By Geraldine Smith, For the Courier

    The spring day dawned warm and clear, a perfect morning for plowing and planting at the Littleton Museum on Saturday.

  • Dakota Ridge graduate Mekayla May, the school’s IB valedictorian, sits on a bench outside the building, wearing a dark blue shirt emblazoned with the name of her future college, Emory University, which has granted her a full-ride scholarship. 

    Mekayla is looking forward to a bright future. But she’ll never forget the dimmer days in her past.

  • One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, or so the saying goes.

    Someone buys an item, only to sell it. The next person uses it, and, eventually, sells it again.

    Take Littleton resident Linda Coughlin, who was selling antiques during Ken Caryl’s community garage sale on Friday. Coughlin had a large feather Mandala dream-catcher prominently displayed on the garage siding, hoping to sell it to someone as it had been sold to her.

  • There were WACs, WAVES and WASPs. And then, there were the women Marines.

    During World War II, women served in and alongside the armed forces, including the Women’s Army Corps (WAC), the Navy’s Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES), and Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs).

  • Kygo’s “Stole the Show” echoed throughout Red Rocks Amphitheatre on Friday afternoon as Chatfield Senior High graduated nearly 450 seniors in its 30th commencement ceremony. As a group of seniors performed their class song one last time, the proverbial spotlight was on, as thousands of parents, family members, friends, teachers and classmates looked on from the stadium seats.

  • Astronomy enthusiasts and passers-by alike caught a rare glimpse of Mercury’s transit across the sun on May 9, the first time the phenomenon had occurred since 2006.

    “If you look about nine o’clock, there should be a clean black dot. The ones in the center are fuzzy sunspots,” said Mike Dempsey, a naturalist at Lookout Mountain Nature Center who was stationed at Mount Falcon Park with a $2,000 telescope donated by volunteers and equipped with a filter to make the viewing possible.

  • The gym at Columbine High School is shrouded in pitch-black darkness on Friday night. Groups of people with hands on the shoulders of those in front of them begin walking into this inky expanse where a Blind Café dinner is about to begin. A blind person leads the students, parents and teachers to their assigned tables.

    Soon the chatter of nearly 80 people seated at tables fills the room, along with aromas of the spaghetti and fresh salad placed before them, which they cannot begin to see.

  • The lyrics of a song performed by the Family Dog String Band at Saturday’s Alley Fest in Morrison couldn’t have been more apt: “Let it rain, let it pour … I’ve got the deep alley blues.”

    The bluegrass band from Eldora was one of several musical groups that set up under canopies and played outdoors as drizzling rain fell.

  • “Hop, cross, turn,” dance teacher Joan Saliman said to a group learning an Israeli dance at Congregation B’nai Chaim in Morrison on Sunday morning.

    With music supplying a steady beat, the dancers moved across the room with fast-paced steps and turns.

    Israeli dance was just one of many activities that people enjoyed at the congregation’s first Israeli cultural festival.

  • Call it a case of being in the right place at the right time — with the right training.

    In January, Doug Parce, a volunteer captain with Inter-Canyon Fire, was going through security at JFK International Airport in New York on a business trip to Europe when another passenger told a TSA agent that somebody wasn’t well.

    Parce saw the man, who was sitting on a bench where passengers put their shoes back on.

  • LAKEWOOD — A bevy of beautiful gowns hanging on racks and walls in the community room of the Belmar Library gave young shoppers many selections to consider during the annual Prom Swap on Friday afternoon.

    Teens and their moms gazed at a variety of styles and colors from full-length turquoise gowns with draped bodices to short purple dresses adorned with sparkly beads. Tuxedos for guys also were among the offerings.

    Friends greeted each other while checking out dresses and tuxes and trying them on for size.

  • LAKEWOOD — A bevy of beautiful gowns hanging on racks and walls in the community room of the Belmar Library gave young shoppers many selections to consider during the annual Prom Swap on Friday afternoon.

    Teens and their moms gazed at a variety of styles and colors from full-length turquoise gowns with draped bodices to short purple dresses adorned with sparkly beads. Tuxedos for guys also were among the offerings.

    Friends greeted each other while checking out dresses and tuxes and trying them on for size.

  • DENVER — The Chatfield High School winter guard placed second at the Rocky Mountain Color Guard State Championships on Saturday — in addition to being rated “most improved” by the judges.

    Thanks to new coach Travis Prudhomme, this is the first time in years that the team has had a winter season.

    “He’s done so much,” senior captain Zoe DeGrande said. “He pushes us way more than any coach I’ve ever had.”

  • Deep snow covering the ground brought the Easter sunrise service indoors at Heritage United Methodist Church on Sunday morning.

    In the warmth of the sanctuary, which was decorated with spring flowers, the Rev. Loren Boyce, senior pastor, led a spirited service filled with song, scripture, words of hope — and humor.

    In his message to the congregation, Boyce told the story of a Sunday school teacher who was explaining the story of Jesus rising from the tomb to her third-grade class.

  • Special Olympics skier Hanna Atkinson is attaining local celebrity status with recent appearances on the Channel 7 News.

    “A lot of people come up to me and say, ‘Are you the famous Hanna on TV?’ ” she said.

    For the past few weeks, Atkinson has been reporting on other Special Olympics athletes during five-minute segments aired on Saturday mornings.

    “It’s awesome,” she said, flashing a big smile. “It’s really cool to get the chance to do that.”