.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Features

  • Light of the World Roman Catholic Church hopes it is less than a year away from completing a plan started almost 35 years ago. 

    The church, on West Bowles Avenue at South Oak Street, is set to break ground on an expansion that will provide a permanent worship space for parishioners. The current worship space, which seats about 700, is in a room originally designed to be a multipurpose area with no permanent seating or altar space. 

  • On a day when frigid temperatures frosted South Jeffco, parents braved the snow and cold to give their kids a chance to play on the ice. 

    Dozens of beginning ice skaters took to the rink at The Edge Ice Arena on Saturday for Foothills Park and Rec’s Give Ice Skating a Try Day. 

    The aim of the free lesson and skate rental is to spark a life-long love for being on the ice, said Lezlea Zessin, Foothills’ figure skating director. 

  • Political changes from 2012 reverberated into 2013 among the Jeffco commissioners, with an opposing political view spicing debates over several key issues.

    The addition of Casey Tighe, the first Democrat elected to the Board of County Commissioners since 2006, gave Commissioner Don Rosier a sparring partner on several issues, including whether Jeffco should raise taxes and whether the county should be on the record as opposed to new gun laws. 

  • Littleton Fire Rescue and the City Council honored a local letter carrier last week with the John P. Cernich Lifesaving Award.

    Postal worker Louise Devers noticed last summer that an elderly man on her route had not checked his mail for three days. Devers, fearing the man was in trouble, talked to a neighbor, who called 911.

  • Walking in a winter wonderland took on a whole new meaning over the weekend as people braved the frigid temperatures to take in a Hudson Christmas at Hudson Gardens. 

    The light show drew holiday revelers despite temperatures that hovered near zero during the evenings. But the cold weather was actually part of the appeal for some.

  • Story and Photograph by Chancey Bush  

    As the sun set behind the mountains, darkness settled over downtown Littleton — but not for long. More than 1 million twinkling lights illuminated the trees and the glowing smiles of eager youngsters waiting for an early glimpse of Santa Claus.

    The holiday spirit swept over Littleton as thousands gathered downtown on Friday night for the 30th annual Candlelight Walk and Tree Lighting tradition. 

  • The Littleton Museum is in the holiday spirit, and it shows. 

    The museum spent the weekend adorning its two historic farmhouses with authentic decorations used during early Christmases in Littleton.

    And while both farmhouses lack the typical modern mayhem of flashing lights and inflatable snowmen, a stark contrast is evident between the 1860s and 1890s decorations, said Andrea Wilhelm, a historical interpreter at the museum. 

  • It takes more than just the will to help and the desire to give to feed thousands of people. 

    It also takes an assembly line that would have made Henry Ford proud. 

    Inside the small gym at South Jeffco’s Abiding Hope Lutheran Church on Nov. 22, 100 volunteers, many of them children, lined up along two banks of tables set up between hundreds of pallets of food. 

    Eileen Schoenberger, a member of the church, shouted  instructions before the assembly line got moving. 

  • As 16-month-old Aislynne stood on the courtroom table in front of Jeffco Judge Ann Gail Meinster on Nov. 21, her soon-to-be mother, Jena, straightened the young girl’s new dress. 

    Everyone in the courtroom laughed as Aislynne danced on the table, clapping her tiny hands to an unheard rhythm. 

    “Well, let’s make her yours officially,” Meinster told Jena through laughter. 

  • Some people define success not by the presence of monetary gain but by the absence of constraints — in other words, the freedom to pursue their dreams. 

    For Todd McFarlane, legendary comic book creator and owner of McFarlane Toys, success has meant the freedom to work without the constraints of others’ limitations. 

  • It might seem counterintuitive, but for many beekeepers, taking care of a hive isn’t just about the sweet reward. 

    Instead, it’s born of a fascination with a creature that so much of our daily sustenance depends upon. 

    Bees, along with other insects and birds, pollinate 35 percent of the world’s food crops. Yet the number of bees in the world has dropped drastically in recent years.  

    The decline made Joanie Bock want to put a beehive in her Littleton backyard. 

  • Marie Rugg was one of the countless patriots who volunteered to help our country during World War II.  

    But on this Veterans Day, Rugg’s story stands out as special. She was in the first wave of women to sign up for the U.S. Marines when women were allowed to join the corps.

    “I wanted to volunteer to free a man to fight,” said Rugg, who now lives in an apartment at the Gardens at Columbine assisted-living facility. “I just wanted to do something for my country.”

  • Jefferson County’s Human Services Department is looking for some good samaritans this holiday season.

    The Holiday Giving Sponsor-A-Family Program matches donors with families receiving services from the county’s Division of Children, Youth and Families, said Korina Keating, Human Services’ volunteer coordinator. 

    A donor receives two lists for the family being shopped for —  one of needs and one of wants, Keating said. 

  • As the judges compiled their notes, the costumed contestants sniffed out the competition. 

    It was a fierce battle. But when all was said and done, Leo, an 8-month-old puppy in a lion outfit, was obviously the top dog among the dozen or so canines competing for title of cutest. 

    The competition was part of the final event of the UFO World Cup Frisbee Dog Series, held Saturday at Clement Park and hosted by the Colorado Disc Dogs. 

  • The group descended on the backyard in south Littleton during the early-morning calm of the weekend.

    Armed with rakes and saws, plastic bags and hammers, the two dozen volunteers attacked a large pile of junk in back of the house. 

    The husband and wife who own the home, and who wished to remain nameless, have lived in the house for 43 years. The husband, a former engineer, had collected various items over the years that he either intended to fix or turn into something new. 

  • It isn’t fall until there are pumpkins.

    There were more than a few pumpkin hunters looking for the perfect canvas for their Halloween art on Saturday at Littleton’s annual Harvest Festival pumpkin patch. 

    “The kids love to come out here and look for pumpkins,” said Betsy Reagan of Littleton. “It’s hard to say no to the kids when they find the perfect pumpkin.”

  • Christina Garza’s paternal grandfather, who worked in a uranium mine, was diagnosed with liver cancer when she was 4. He died a year later. 

    Garza knew then her calling was to be a doctor.

  • Littleton is known for its genteel small-town ways — even the walking dead obey the traffic laws.

    About 300 zombies weaved their way through downtown Saturday, led by a Dixieland jazz band playing a funeral dirge, as part of the fourth annual Zombie Crawl and Pig Roast. 

    While most zombie hoards tend to cause mayhem and destruction, this band of undead stuck to the sidewalks and obeyed the traffic lights. 

  • Students at Montessori School at Ken Caryl have learned the hard way that sometimes Halloween can be more about tricks than treats. 

    A 40-pound pumpkin that the students in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten had grown in hopes of raffling off to raise money for classroom activities was vandalized in mid-September.

  • One by one, the balloons joined an airborne procession above Clement Park as they floated toward the horizon. As each name was read aloud, a person in the crowd of about 1,000 released another balloon that rose and joined the rest.  

    More than 450 names were read Saturday at A Walk to Remember. Each balloon carried the name of an infant who died, either as a stillborn baby, from SIDS or from a life-shortening illness.