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Features

  • It just doesn’t feel like the Fourth of July without a big, colorful fireworks display. 

    Especially if you’re the one putting on the show.

    “This is our Fourth of July. Some people have barbecues — we shoot fireworks,” said Les Nack, a member of the Western Enterprises Inc. crew that was responsible for Littleton’s 21-minute-long fireworks display to cap the city’s July Fourth celebration. “I think you have to have a little firebug in you to do this job.”

  • The superhero team had become one with the mud.

    Spider-Man, Batman, Iron Man and Wonder Woman were covered in muck as they crawled across the finish line. 

    “I’m not Wonder Woman,” Amanda Carlson corrected as she pointed to her chest. “I’m Supergirl.”

    Carlson’s Supergirl insignia was barely distinguishable because of the thick layer of ooze she had accumulated over the 5-kilometer course. Only her bright red boots somehow managed to maintain their luster. 

  • Having modern conveniences in the kitchen doesn't always translate into doing less work. 

    Just ask a woman trying to cook her family a meal in the 1890s.

    "Industrialization made it harder for women," said Kathie Owens-Tucker, an interpreter at the 1890s farmhouse in the Littleton Museum. "We were expected to do more with all the new modern conveniences."

  • It’s not often that bicycles being prepped for a triathlon have streamers attached to their handlebars.

    Yet during the Foothills Feat Kids Triathlon on Sunday, it was a pretty common sight.

    Two age groups, 6 to 8 and 9 to 14, competed to post the best times while swimming, biking and running. The event was a mini version of the adult sprint triathlon that took place earlier in the day at the Foothills Park & Rec facilities on South Ward Street.

  • Any one of the Harley-Davidson or BMW motorcycles lined up at the Jeffco sheriff’s firing range was a bike lover’s dream. 

    And a bad guy’s nightmare. 

    The Sheriff’s Office hosted an advanced police motorcycle school for more than 50 officers from 11 area law enforcement agencies, including Jeffco deputies, on May 14-15. The 40-hour course gave the officers a rare chance to improve on their skills and to practice live-fire exercises while on their bikes. 

  • Veterans at Arapahoe Community College have a new home base at school. 

    The Veterans Service Center, which opened last month, was created by ACC to help meet the needs of the influx of veterans signing up for classes, said Nancy Nickless, Veterans Affairs certifying official and financial aid counselor for ACC. 

  • Columbine High School and the surrounding community took to the pavement again Saturday for the eighth annual Run for Remembrance through Clement Park. 

    The 5K run/walk raised money for Craig Hospital, the Columbine Memorial and the Frank DeAngelis Columbine High School Academic Foundation. 

  • History isn’t always made during epic events. 

    Sometimes it takes only a $30 check and two signatures. 

    When Jennifer Whitton and Tana Trejillo signed their civil union certificate last Wednesday morning at the Jeffco clerk and recorder’s office, staff members interrupted what they were doing to applaud. 

    It was the first same-sex civil union in Jefferson County.

    Whitton and Trejillo, together five and a half years, were all smiles as they handed over the $30 check to the county.  

  • If you’re trying to inspire kids to pursue a career in science, engineering, math or technology, it helps to have an astronaut and some liquid nitrogen on your side. 

    Lockheed Martin opened up its Waterton Facility in Littleton to about 1,400 kids last Thursday as part of its nationwide Young Minds at Work Day. Company employees brought their kids and their kids’ friends for a day of science-based fun that featured NASA astronaut Rex Walheim, along with a few rockets and frozen rubber balls.

  • Ah, duct tape. Is there anything it can’t do?

    The handyman’s favorite tool to fix anything around the house is also one of the most versatile materials for do-it-yourself craft projects. The wide tape, which can be found in a variety of colors and designs, can be used to make anything from wallets and purses to full-length prom dresses.

    “My friend makes a lot of things with duct tape. She made a prom dress for her sister completely out of duct tape,” said Sarah Bruner, 13. “It’s pretty easy to work with.”

  • Gray skies couldn’t dampen the mood of the more than 200 participants in the 20th annual Courage Walk in Golden on Saturday morning.

    The annual event honors the strength and courage of crime victims and those who have lost loved ones to violence. The Courage Walk coincides with National Victims’ Rights Week.

    Jeffco probation department employees Brandy Lewis and Wendy Ala participated in the Courage Walk for the first time.

  • Sunday marked the 66th annual Easter Sunrise Service at the Red Rocks Amphitheater in Morrison.  

  • The first 26 years of the Jefferson County open-space sales tax and three successful referendums at the ballot box proved that voters value open lands. In 1998 they showed how much by passing a measure that helped double the amount of scenery and public land in Jeffco’s Open Space park system.

  • When development threatened to turn their paradise into parking lots, the people of Jefferson County decided to preserve the beautiful landscapes they treasured before open land became subdivision material.

    Nov. 7, 2013, will mark the 40th anniversary of the day Jeffco voters agreed to enact a 0.05-cent sales tax to fund a program that would preserve some of the scenic peaks, outcrops, meadows and streams that define our county from the mountains to the plains.

  • St. Patrick’s Day can evoke images of green beer, parades and “Kiss me, I’m Irish” buttons. Yet what can get lost in all the noise and revelry is the beauty and emotion of Irish culture.

    And there is no better reflection of that than in the music of the Emerald Isle, which was on display Saturday at Littleton’s Bemis Public Library. Tradition, Tartan and Tears, a local Celtic band, played a selection of classic Irish songs in celebration of the holiday.

  • When most people think of spring break and weed, this probably isn’t what they have in mind.

    A group of about 140 students, almost all from Michigan State University, were at South Valley Park helping Jeffco Open Space to eradicate pervasive noxious weeds.

    The students were here instead of the beach as part of Students Today, Leaders Forever, an alternative spring break for college students that sends them across the country doing good deed after good deed.

  • With a fire in the hearth and a pot of tea at their side, three women worked stitch by stitch Saturday to help move along a five-year project at the Littleton Museum’s living 1860s farm. 

    The kaleidoscope-patterned quilt was being created in the same way it would have been more than 150 years ago. Andrea Wilhelm, one of the women gathered around the frame holding the three layers of the quilt together, is the part-time interpreter at the museum. 

  • Scott Stanley gently placed his left arm around wife Heather’s shoulder as the minister began a sermon about the many forms that true love can take. As the sermon progressed, Heather moved closer into her husband’s embrace.

    Sunday’s sermon held special meaning for the couple as they listened with the rest of the congregation at Columbine Unitarian Universalist Church. Heather and Scott, along with two other couples, were renewing their wedding vows. 

  • Once a month, usually on the first Saturday, members of the Scraps to Treasure quilting club gather at WaterStone Community Church to create creative and colorful quilts that will warm the hearts of people in need. 

  • The crowd that had been mingling and eating homemade cookies migrated to the makeshift dance floor at the beckon of the caller.

    “Time to square up,” yelled Jan Hormuth as she joined the new dancers, who were quickly forming groups.