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Features

  • The crowd that had been mingling and eating homemade cookies migrated to the makeshift dance floor at the beckon of the caller.

    “Time to square up,” yelled Jan Hormuth as she joined the new dancers, who were quickly forming groups.

  • Learning a language often means learning a culture as well. Language teacher Yi Ren points out that giving a person from China a clock for a gift can be tricky.

    "Don't give a clock. The pronunciation of ‘clock’ is similar to ‘bad luck,’ " said Yi, who is teaching a class in Mandarin Chinese at the Bemis Public Library. "When I teach a class, I focus on the language part and the culture part."

  •  Outgoing district attorney Scott Storey will stay in the office as senior chief deputy district attorney. 

  • Newly elected District Attorney Pete Weir is close to his new job. So close, in fact, that when he and his wife, Susan, moved into their Golden home, they had to rearrange their bedroom because they could see Jefferson County’s administrative building reflected in the mirror.

  • A special bond exists between a horse and its rider.

    Unlike the relationship between a dog and his master, one built on obedience, the relationship between a horse and rider is one built on trust and cooperation.

     

    “It's a partnership. You understand each other,” said Heidi Henderson. “You have to work together.”

  • Everyone loves an underdog.

    Nemo, a dachshund-beagle mix, was found abandoned in a box-store parking lot in Joplin, Mo. But even though a good Samaritan rescued the 3-month-old pup, his future didn't look bright. Nemo was born with a deformed right front leg. Instead of a normal leg, he had two small legs attached to each other, a useless appendage.

    Abandoned dogs with severe deformities usually don't get adopted, and in many cases they are euthanized.

  • When people think of Kuwait, the tiny Arab state on the Persian Gulf, they frequently picture oil derricks, the Iraqi invasion that sparked the first Persian Gulf War, and an arid desert landscape.

     

    Line dancing probably doesn’t cross their minds. 

    Yet Littleton resident Cady Kennedy can’t separate her memories of Kuwait from dance steps and country-western tunes. 

  •  By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    Hope for animals and for the community was the inspiration for a center housed at Foothills Animal Shelter in Golden.

     

    The Hope Center for Humane Education consists of a large room available for public events and private functions, and the space serves many of the shelter’s goals, from educating the public about homeless pets to fund-raising to animal training.    

  • Foothills Park and Recreation golf director Tom Woodard started playing in a junior program at Denver’s City Park at 9 years of age, when instructors correctly recognized a budding golf prodigy.

    The family had moved from Midland, Texas, to Denver into a house just two blocks away from the course, where some of the neighborhood kids worked as caddies.

    “I just followed them down there,” said Tom Woodard, 56, Foothills’ golf director for the last six years. “It just took off from there.”

  • By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    Hang gliders and paragliders catching the currents at Lookout Mountain are enjoying the fruits of their joint labors with Jefferson County Open Space: an upgraded trail to the popular launch site on Windy Saddle.

     

    The airborne adventurers earn their rides by hauling gear weighing up to 80 pounds to the launch area — and a deteriorating foot trail was making that undertaking both unsafe and unpleasant.

  •  Ronald Hopp

     

    Happy holidays from the Foothills Park & Recreation District! As your community organization providing park and recreational opportunities, Foothills creates activities and events that fulfill current trends or requests from community members. The services we provide are affordable, accessible to everyone and in most cases in your own backyard. 

  •  By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    A star shined at MorningStar Senior Living in Littleton on a recent Saturday afternoon. Her name is Kay Lazarus, and she was the star of the show celebrating her 100th birthday.

    A dozen family members, some of whom journeyed from as far as Boston, joined dozens of friends, fellow residents and staff to fete the centenarian, who turned 100 on Nov. 7.

     

  • Robynne Hill played competitive soccer until the age of 12, when she developed a nervous system disorder that causes intense pain in her legs. But four years later, she is thrilled to be part of another competitive sport: sled hockey. 

    Now 16, Hill catches a ride from Colorado Springs with her mom for practices and games at The Edge Ice Arena, where she has been playing with the Colorado Avalanche Sled Hockey Team for just over a year. 

     

  • Since its completion and dedication in September 2007, the Columbine Memorial has served as a place for the public to reflect on the events of April 20, 1999, at Columbine High School and to honor the victims who lost their lives in the school shootings.

    The overall design of the monument on Rebel Hill in Clement Park, with a panoramic view of the Front Range and snowcapped peaks, has stood the test of time. But the grout in the engraved lettering on granite tablets has deteriorated.

  • Crowds of leather-clad bikers held brightly colored balloons as they waited in the parking lot at Columbine High School on Sunday morning.
    Columbine principal Frank DeAngelis told the crowd that every balloon represented a person who had lost their life to school violence.

  • By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    Dachshunds and dunkel and dancing, oh my! These and more were on tap at the Oktoberfest at the Highlands Ranch Town Center on Saturday.

    The celebration, presented annually by the Highlands Ranch Cultural Affairs Association, debuted with the tapping of the keg at 2 p.m. and concluded with fireworks in the evening (rescheduled after the July 4 cancellation).

  • The new playground in Columbine Hills Park is more than a neighborhood amenity — it is truly a community project and a source of pride and accomplishment.

    About 150 residents of all ages turned out at West Elmhurst Avenue and South Kendall Boulevard on July 14 for the community playground-raising, which lasted from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. A resident DJ provided the motivational sounds, and a local deli provided the lunch for free.

  • Thirteen years after the tragedy, a father whose son was killed in the Columbine High School shootings on April 20, 1999, has written a book about his struggle to come to terms with grief and rise above the horrible events that shattered his family's life.

    "Walking in Daniel's Shoes," by Tom Mauser, is a factual and sometimes emotional account by a parent of what happens to a family when a child is murdered.

  • By Laura Bernero

    For the Courier

    A two-year study in Jeffco has identified 35 rare plants and 11 rare animal species that the county will try to protect in its future conservation efforts and open space plans.

    The biodiversity survey, which also identified one rare fungus, was conducted by scientists from the Colorado Natural Heritage Program over the past two growing seasons. County Open Space planners will use the data to help make environmentally conscious choices when planning open space areas, parks and trails.