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Features

  • Gray skies couldn’t dampen the mood of the more than 200 participants in the 20th annual Courage Walk in Golden on Saturday morning.

    The annual event honors the strength and courage of crime victims and those who have lost loved ones to violence. The Courage Walk coincides with National Victims’ Rights Week.

    Jeffco probation department employees Brandy Lewis and Wendy Ala participated in the Courage Walk for the first time.

  • Sunday marked the 66th annual Easter Sunrise Service at the Red Rocks Amphitheater in Morrison.  

  • The first 26 years of the Jefferson County open-space sales tax and three successful referendums at the ballot box proved that voters value open lands. In 1998 they showed how much by passing a measure that helped double the amount of scenery and public land in Jeffco’s Open Space park system.

  • When development threatened to turn their paradise into parking lots, the people of Jefferson County decided to preserve the beautiful landscapes they treasured before open land became subdivision material.

    Nov. 7, 2013, will mark the 40th anniversary of the day Jeffco voters agreed to enact a 0.05-cent sales tax to fund a program that would preserve some of the scenic peaks, outcrops, meadows and streams that define our county from the mountains to the plains.

  • St. Patrick’s Day can evoke images of green beer, parades and “Kiss me, I’m Irish” buttons. Yet what can get lost in all the noise and revelry is the beauty and emotion of Irish culture.

    And there is no better reflection of that than in the music of the Emerald Isle, which was on display Saturday at Littleton’s Bemis Public Library. Tradition, Tartan and Tears, a local Celtic band, played a selection of classic Irish songs in celebration of the holiday.

  • When most people think of spring break and weed, this probably isn’t what they have in mind.

    A group of about 140 students, almost all from Michigan State University, were at South Valley Park helping Jeffco Open Space to eradicate pervasive noxious weeds.

    The students were here instead of the beach as part of Students Today, Leaders Forever, an alternative spring break for college students that sends them across the country doing good deed after good deed.

  • With a fire in the hearth and a pot of tea at their side, three women worked stitch by stitch Saturday to help move along a five-year project at the Littleton Museum’s living 1860s farm. 

    The kaleidoscope-patterned quilt was being created in the same way it would have been more than 150 years ago. Andrea Wilhelm, one of the women gathered around the frame holding the three layers of the quilt together, is the part-time interpreter at the museum. 

  • Scott Stanley gently placed his left arm around wife Heather’s shoulder as the minister began a sermon about the many forms that true love can take. As the sermon progressed, Heather moved closer into her husband’s embrace.

    Sunday’s sermon held special meaning for the couple as they listened with the rest of the congregation at Columbine Unitarian Universalist Church. Heather and Scott, along with two other couples, were renewing their wedding vows. 

  • Once a month, usually on the first Saturday, members of the Scraps to Treasure quilting club gather at WaterStone Community Church to create creative and colorful quilts that will warm the hearts of people in need. 

  • The crowd that had been mingling and eating homemade cookies migrated to the makeshift dance floor at the beckon of the caller.

    “Time to square up,” yelled Jan Hormuth as she joined the new dancers, who were quickly forming groups.

  • Learning a language often means learning a culture as well. Language teacher Yi Ren points out that giving a person from China a clock for a gift can be tricky.

    "Don't give a clock. The pronunciation of ‘clock’ is similar to ‘bad luck,’ " said Yi, who is teaching a class in Mandarin Chinese at the Bemis Public Library. "When I teach a class, I focus on the language part and the culture part."

  •  Outgoing district attorney Scott Storey will stay in the office as senior chief deputy district attorney. 

  • Newly elected District Attorney Pete Weir is close to his new job. So close, in fact, that when he and his wife, Susan, moved into their Golden home, they had to rearrange their bedroom because they could see Jefferson County’s administrative building reflected in the mirror.

  • A special bond exists between a horse and its rider.

    Unlike the relationship between a dog and his master, one built on obedience, the relationship between a horse and rider is one built on trust and cooperation.

     

    “It's a partnership. You understand each other,” said Heidi Henderson. “You have to work together.”

  • Everyone loves an underdog.

    Nemo, a dachshund-beagle mix, was found abandoned in a box-store parking lot in Joplin, Mo. But even though a good Samaritan rescued the 3-month-old pup, his future didn't look bright. Nemo was born with a deformed right front leg. Instead of a normal leg, he had two small legs attached to each other, a useless appendage.

    Abandoned dogs with severe deformities usually don't get adopted, and in many cases they are euthanized.

  • When people think of Kuwait, the tiny Arab state on the Persian Gulf, they frequently picture oil derricks, the Iraqi invasion that sparked the first Persian Gulf War, and an arid desert landscape.

     

    Line dancing probably doesn’t cross their minds. 

    Yet Littleton resident Cady Kennedy can’t separate her memories of Kuwait from dance steps and country-western tunes. 

  •  By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    Hope for animals and for the community was the inspiration for a center housed at Foothills Animal Shelter in Golden.

     

    The Hope Center for Humane Education consists of a large room available for public events and private functions, and the space serves many of the shelter’s goals, from educating the public about homeless pets to fund-raising to animal training.    

  • Foothills Park and Recreation golf director Tom Woodard started playing in a junior program at Denver’s City Park at 9 years of age, when instructors correctly recognized a budding golf prodigy.

    The family had moved from Midland, Texas, to Denver into a house just two blocks away from the course, where some of the neighborhood kids worked as caddies.

    “I just followed them down there,” said Tom Woodard, 56, Foothills’ golf director for the last six years. “It just took off from there.”

  • By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    Hang gliders and paragliders catching the currents at Lookout Mountain are enjoying the fruits of their joint labors with Jefferson County Open Space: an upgraded trail to the popular launch site on Windy Saddle.

     

    The airborne adventurers earn their rides by hauling gear weighing up to 80 pounds to the launch area — and a deteriorating foot trail was making that undertaking both unsafe and unpleasant.

  •  Ronald Hopp

     

    Happy holidays from the Foothills Park & Recreation District! As your community organization providing park and recreational opportunities, Foothills creates activities and events that fulfill current trends or requests from community members. The services we provide are affordable, accessible to everyone and in most cases in your own backyard.