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Features

  • Foothills Park and Recreation golf director Tom Woodard started playing in a junior program at Denver’s City Park at 9 years of age, when instructors correctly recognized a budding golf prodigy.

    The family had moved from Midland, Texas, to Denver into a house just two blocks away from the course, where some of the neighborhood kids worked as caddies.

    “I just followed them down there,” said Tom Woodard, 56, Foothills’ golf director for the last six years. “It just took off from there.”

  • By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    Hang gliders and paragliders catching the currents at Lookout Mountain are enjoying the fruits of their joint labors with Jefferson County Open Space: an upgraded trail to the popular launch site on Windy Saddle.

     

    The airborne adventurers earn their rides by hauling gear weighing up to 80 pounds to the launch area — and a deteriorating foot trail was making that undertaking both unsafe and unpleasant.

  •  Ronald Hopp

     

    Happy holidays from the Foothills Park & Recreation District! As your community organization providing park and recreational opportunities, Foothills creates activities and events that fulfill current trends or requests from community members. The services we provide are affordable, accessible to everyone and in most cases in your own backyard. 

  •  By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    A star shined at MorningStar Senior Living in Littleton on a recent Saturday afternoon. Her name is Kay Lazarus, and she was the star of the show celebrating her 100th birthday.

    A dozen family members, some of whom journeyed from as far as Boston, joined dozens of friends, fellow residents and staff to fete the centenarian, who turned 100 on Nov. 7.

     

  • Robynne Hill played competitive soccer until the age of 12, when she developed a nervous system disorder that causes intense pain in her legs. But four years later, she is thrilled to be part of another competitive sport: sled hockey. 

    Now 16, Hill catches a ride from Colorado Springs with her mom for practices and games at The Edge Ice Arena, where she has been playing with the Colorado Avalanche Sled Hockey Team for just over a year. 

     

  • Since its completion and dedication in September 2007, the Columbine Memorial has served as a place for the public to reflect on the events of April 20, 1999, at Columbine High School and to honor the victims who lost their lives in the school shootings.

    The overall design of the monument on Rebel Hill in Clement Park, with a panoramic view of the Front Range and snowcapped peaks, has stood the test of time. But the grout in the engraved lettering on granite tablets has deteriorated.

  • Crowds of leather-clad bikers held brightly colored balloons as they waited in the parking lot at Columbine High School on Sunday morning.
    Columbine principal Frank DeAngelis told the crowd that every balloon represented a person who had lost their life to school violence.

  • By Alison Mahnken

    For the Courier

    Dachshunds and dunkel and dancing, oh my! These and more were on tap at the Oktoberfest at the Highlands Ranch Town Center on Saturday.

    The celebration, presented annually by the Highlands Ranch Cultural Affairs Association, debuted with the tapping of the keg at 2 p.m. and concluded with fireworks in the evening (rescheduled after the July 4 cancellation).

  • The new playground in Columbine Hills Park is more than a neighborhood amenity — it is truly a community project and a source of pride and accomplishment.

    About 150 residents of all ages turned out at West Elmhurst Avenue and South Kendall Boulevard on July 14 for the community playground-raising, which lasted from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. A resident DJ provided the motivational sounds, and a local deli provided the lunch for free.

  • Thirteen years after the tragedy, a father whose son was killed in the Columbine High School shootings on April 20, 1999, has written a book about his struggle to come to terms with grief and rise above the horrible events that shattered his family's life.

    "Walking in Daniel's Shoes," by Tom Mauser, is a factual and sometimes emotional account by a parent of what happens to a family when a child is murdered.

  • By Laura Bernero

    For the Courier

    A two-year study in Jeffco has identified 35 rare plants and 11 rare animal species that the county will try to protect in its future conservation efforts and open space plans.

    The biodiversity survey, which also identified one rare fungus, was conducted by scientists from the Colorado Natural Heritage Program over the past two growing seasons. County Open Space planners will use the data to help make environmentally conscious choices when planning open space areas, parks and trails.

  • A dizzying array of dogs leapt and splashed about Sunday during Foothills Park and Recreation’s annual Doggy Dip at Deer Creek and Weaver Hollow pools.

    At Deer Creek Pool, more than 100 area pooches eagerly pulled their masters through the gates to get their chance to jump into the drink. Some pooches played under water buckets that intermittently doused them, while others did Phelpsian laps to retrieve floating toys from the end of the lap pool.

    Children giggled as dogs of all sizes and shapes leapt into the water and shook off on the pool deck.

  • The Dinosaur Ridge Visitor Center could be moving to a larger, modern facility on 19 acres that were purchased by Jeffco Open Space in 2009. 

    Under a tentative agreement between the Friends of Dinosaur Ridge and the county, by 2018 the center would move to a new building higher on the Hogback and closer to the famous dinosaur tracks.

  • Clement Park has gone to the dogs. For one day, anyway.

    Foothills Park and Recreation hosted the Total Performance Disc Dogs club during the district’s Summer Concert Series on Friday.

    Over a chorus of barking dogs and raucous music, Matt DiAno, a member of Total Performance Disc Dogs, shared what goes into the sport. Total Performance Disc Dogs is a group of dog-loving friends who perform all over Colorado. They specialize in Frisbee performances, but also present agility and herding performances as well.

  • “Don’t run from Jefferson County deputies,” Jeffco Sheriff Ted Mink warns with a chuckle.
    That’s because the department is deploying the fastest, most technologically advanced patrol car on the road, according to Rusty Hardy, Jeffco fleet manager.
    Hardy, an 18-year veteran of the Sheriff’s Office, said Jeffco is the first law enforcement agency in Colorado to introduce the 2013 Ford Interceptor into its fleet.

  • As a tribute to the spirit of hard-working dogs that unselfishly serve humanity, a Golden Eagle Scout has created a worthy monument on the grounds of the Foothills Animal Shelter.

    About 100 people turned out for the unveiling of the bronze service-dog memorial sculpture on June 12 in the courtyard at the shelter near Sixth Avenue and Indiana Street.

    After various participants made their remarks, the Boy Scouts gathered around the statue and removed the silver tarp to reveal the bronze replica of a German shepherd by local artist and Rotary member Pat Madison.

  • Bob Shiflet not only has a way with bees, he has a biochemistry degree and a vast knowledge of bee lore that he’s not afraid to share.

    People who want to learn more about honeybees or who want to start cultivating bees in their own backyards should meet Shiflet, a South Jeffco resident and the head beekeeper at Hudson Gardens.

  • For Army Sgt. Eric Bishop, last week’s homecoming from South Korea — his third overseas deployment — meant seeing his 10-month-old son, Sebastian, for the first time.

     

    For his wife, Charlotte, who spent the last year wrangling a 2-year-old and changing and feeding their new baby, the event held simpler significance.

    "I am hoping to get more sleep," she said.

    Sebastian was born last June 28, and during the past 10 months he saw his father only in photos and on a computer screen. 

  • Fleeing on a moment’s notice from her home on Pleasant Park Road was taxing enough for Conifer resident Tracy McCandless. But the task of relocating five horses and a cat caused her stress level to rise exponentially.

    Fortunately for McCandless and numerous other residents, volunteer teams of animal rescuers were prepared to help evacuate animals in the midst of the deadly Lower North Fork Fire.