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Opinion

  • Leading up to the Republican gubernatorial primary June 24, the Colorado Springs Gazette ran an editorial May 19 urging candidates Mike Kopp and Scott Gessler to drop out of the race to ensure that Bob Beauprez would win the nomination over Tom Tancredo. The Gazette argued that Tancredo was not a viable candidate in the general election and that Gov. John Hickenlooper’s re-election would be a sure thing if Tancredo became the Republican nominee.

  • Maybe they just got tired of being called the new conservative majority.

    How else can you explain school board members Ken Witt, John Newkirk and Julie Williams voting to pay, including performance incentives, new superintendent Daniel McMinimee almost 40 percent more than his predecessor and to give him a five-year contract despite the fact that he’s never been a superintendent before? The decision doesn’t meet any definition of conservative I’ve ever heard.

  • Board majority disregarding community

    Editor:

    Parents and citizens of Jefferson County ought to feel outraged at the recent actions of the new majority members of the school board. Let’s see. What’s happened so far this year?

    • A decision to provide all-day, paid kindergarten at Lasley Elementary in Jeffco is on the chopping block, something parents and community members of this county had already voted on and approved.

  • Just because it’s legal doesn’t mean it’s right. Or, perhaps more importantly, smart.

    When the Jefferson County Board of Education designated Daniel McMinimee as the sole finalist to serve as the new superintendent of schools, it met the requirements of Colorado law. What the board — or, more specifically, the board’s majority of Ken Witt, John Newkirk and Julie Williams — didn’t do was to learn from earlier miscues that how you do things is just as important as what you do.

  • McCasky’s pleas for county funds are absurd and hypocritical
    Editor:

  • By Lesley Dahlkemper

    School Board President

  • While there are many opinions about how we should educate our children in Jefferson County, we can all agree on one underlying principle — we care about our children, and we want the best for them.
    Jeffco schools have struggled over the last three years to manage more than $60 million in state funding cuts without hurting kids. We have reduced costs, closed under-enrolled schools, trimmed staff, streamlined administration and cut compensation.

  • A ‘Colossus’ waste of money
    Editor:
    I know it is the wrong word, but it is so appropriate that I just had to use it. Doesn’t it remind you of a giant marble statue used to deify some ancient ruler? Well, that is what the crosswalk at Wadsworth and Bowles is: a $3.5 million waste of taxpayer money.

  • State needs more revenue to avoid devastating cuts
    Editor:
    As a parent and taxpayer, I am saddened and outraged by the ill-advised path that we are on in the name of reducing spending.
    We are in a race to the bottom — to become last in the nation for education funding. Colorado is 48th in funding K-12 education, 49th in funding higher education, and we are falling faster every day.

  • By Jeffco Board of Commissioners

  • For much of its 150-year history, the Sheriff’s Office has relied on volunteer deputies — the reserves — to assist with public safety assignments throughout Jefferson County. These state-certified law enforcement officers are essential to our agency’s mission, and soon we’ll be looking to add a few new faces to their ranks. Do you have what it takes?
     
    Who are the reserves?

  • League of Women Voters opposes 60, 61 and 101

    Editor:

    This letter is written in opposition to three fiscal ballot issues, 60, 61 and 101, which will be on the November ballot. The League of Women Voters is recommending that voters in Jefferson County vote no on each of these measures.

  • If you think you’re seeing more negative campaign ads this year, it’s not just you. 2010 is shaping up to be an all-time high — or low — for negative campaigning. It’s gotten so bad, a recent Denver Post headline read, “It’s a miracle! Some positive campaign ads!” I still haven’t seen those yet.

  • As we move through early fall and into the final weeks before this midterm election in November, I’ve been thinking of those that served our state in past legislative sessions.

  • Sometimes I wonder whether we use the right nomenclature to describe the basic political divide in America. We see “liberals” on this side and “conservatives” on that side, with Democrats generally representing the former and Republicans the latter.

    But a compelling case can be made that the political landscape is really more sensibly divided into those who believe government should have a limited role (libertarians) and those who prefer government to have a more active role (statists). 

  • People in civilized societies understand that we have collective needs that can be met only through the coordinated efforts of citizens. Many of those collective needs are met through the activities of governments. We expect our federal, state, local and special-district governments to do things that it makes no sense to do individually. We drive on public roads. We get water and dispose of wastewater through governmentally owned utilities. We educate our children in public schools. We protect our homes and businesses through governmental fire departments.

  • At what point will we finally have enough surveillance cameras? It’s hard to go anywhere without being watched by at least one, and often several, closed-circuit eyes in the sky. On a typical five-minute walk in downtown Denver, you don’t have to look very hard to find 20 or more cameras. They’re on lampposts, the sides of buildings, on ceilings, atop traffic lights and along walls.

  • Young people today have to navigate a complex world and a complicated social scene. As law enforcement officers, we want to mitigate the dangers so that teens and young adults can safely enjoy their free time. We urge parents and teens to join us in doing so. Here are some issues to consider

     

    Unsupervised parties

  • So it’s come to this. In perhaps the most favorable Republican year since at least 1994, scandal-plagued GOP front-runner Scott McInnis can’t even close the deal on his own party’s nomination, much less the general election. 

  • Women. More specifically, suburban women. Most specifically, independent and Republican suburban women.

    Now that we’ve made it through the primary process and have a race for Colorado’s U.S. Senate seat between Democratic incumbent Michael Bennet and Republican challenger Ken Buck, it looks to me like the key to victory in this year’s race will be unaffiliated and Republican women voters from the suburbs.