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Opinion

  • I’ve had my share of senior moments the last week, more of them unforgettable than forgetful.

    No single piece of mail can more brutally deliver mortality’s sharp stick in the eye than the dreaded AARP membership packet, and my own little reminder of the five-decade milestone came when seniors and their concerns were uppermost on my mind.

  • The bloom of term limits in Colorado seems to be off the rose.

  • Hannah Hayes

    When Robert Oppenheimer, the physicist who directed the Manhattan Project, witnessed the first atomic explosion, he quoted a line from the Bhagavad-Gita, “I am become Death, the shatterer of worlds.” The military smiled, and the rest of us started worrying.

  • Emily’s List, an organization that was formed to support the election of pro-choice Democratic women, is named based upon what has become an increasingly true idiom of political campaigns. Emily stands for “Early money is like yeast.” Candidates’ ability to raise funds in the early stages of campaigns has something to do with how they will use that money in their campaigns, but has much more do to with how their campaigns are viewed by others.

  • By Hannah Hayes

  • The year 2010 is shaping up to be one of the most active primary seasons in recent Colorado history. In the U.S. Senate race, Democratic incumbent Sen. Michael Bennet (who was appointed by Gov. Bill Ritter when Ken Salazar became secretary of the interior) faces a spirited challenge from within his own party from Andrew Romanoff, former speaker of the state House.

  • Do you have any information that might help investigators crack one of Jeffco’s unsolved cases? The crimes outlined here have dogged detectives — some for many years.

    If you have a tip on any of these cases, please call our tip line at 303-271-5612 or send us an e-mail. Sometimes all it takes is one tip to help bring a criminal to justice.

    Brandi Jo Malonson:

    Disappeared in December 2006

  • One of my dad’s favorite stories about me is when he took me to the Big Top to buy a kite when I was 5. We found everything we needed for 97 cents. I handed my dollar to the store clerk and waited for change. When I asked for it, he told me it was for the governor. I said I didn’t want to buy a governor. After my dad and the clerk explained that the governor was going to use my 3 cents for the road to get to the store and the school I would soon attend, I acquiesced and let him keep the change I had anticipated.

  • As in physics, politics has a handful of immutable laws. One of these is the Law of Overreaching, which states that the party in power will inevitably overreach.

    Majority parties tend to act as though the entire population shares their core agenda. The problem with this, of course, is that for the most part no majority is possible without the support of a sizable number of voters who aren’t affiliated with either party.

  • After the assassination of Sen. Robert Kennedy in 1968, his brother Ted ended a moving eulogy by saying, “My brother need not be idealized, or enlarged in death beyond what he was in life; to be remembered simply as a good and decent man, who saw wrong and tried to right it, saw suffering and tried to heal it, saw war and tried to stop it. Those of us who loved him and who take him to his rest today pray that what he was to us and what he wished for others will someday come to pass for all the world.”

  • By Hannah Hayes

    In the spirit of Michigan, where I’m at: Should Flint tear down one-third of its city? There’s a June 6 article in Forbes magazine called “The Best and Worst Cities for Recession Recovery.” Colorado has one city on the “best” list, Boulder, because of its technology industry and the university creating stable jobs. At the top of the “worst” list is Flint, Mich., with “the longest road to recovery.”

  • When members of Congress left Washington to spend their August recess at home in their districts, pundits predicted they would be bombarded with constituent communication about President Obama’s health care reform proposal. Due partly to public interest in the issue and significantly more by sophisticated grassroots efforts by supporters and opponents of the initiative, the pundits have been right.

  • We all know that 911 is the number to call in the United States to get help in a police, fire or medical emergency. A 911 call goes to the emergency dispatch center closest to the caller, and trained personnel send the emergency responders to the caller’s location.

    In Jefferson County, a team of dispatchers answers 163,000 service calls a year and dispatches five law enforcement agencies and 11 fire departments. Our dispatchers are trained in emergency medical dispatching, meaning they can talk a caller through basic medical treatment until help arrives.

     

  • I’m one of those people who can’t help but shift into lecture mode whenever people complain about jury duty. I automatically launch into how jury duty is a privilege and that it and voting make living in our democratic society so special. Despite my civic pride, I hadn’t been called for jury duty since 1994 and hadn’t been on a jury since 1992.

  • Between Durango and Pagosa Springs is a hidden gem of Colorado history. Before prehistoric dwellings were built into the cliffs at Mesa Verde, Ancestral Puebloans created a small settlement on top of a mesa near two dramatic pillars of stone. The place is called Chimney Rock.

  • By Hannah Hayes

    For 30 years Iran has slowly been staging a rebellion. The recent election and demonstrations may be a turning point for those with legitimate grievances against the repressive mullahs. It is unclear to what degree there was voter fraud, yet students, women and the middle class have certainly raised profound issues while risking everything. Unfortunately, there is not yet a sufficient coalition present that unites these groups of revolutionaries with labor, military, ethnic groups and oil producers.

  • Do Colorado roads sometimes feel like the Wild, Wild West? A new law seeks safer roads and happy trails for all, here in Jeffco and throughout Colorado.

    Gov. Bill Ritter signed into law Senate Bill 148, the Bicycle Safety Bill, clarifying our state’s rules on how bicycles and motor vehicles share public roads. Sponsors Sen. Greg Brophy, R-Wray, and Rep. Michael Merrifield, D-Manitou Springs, worked with fellow legislators to find common-sense approaches that enhance road safety for everyone. The new law takes effect on Aug. 5.

  • In Denver area ice hockey circles, he was known simply as “the goalie in the wheelchair.”

    Kyle Stubbs and his chair stopped pucks for a lot of teams over the years: the Warthogs, the Grinders, Berserk, Spitfire, and Chimney Full of Squirrels, to name a few. And he frustrated the shooters of other teams too numerous to list.

    On a recent Saturday, many of us who played with and against Kyle gathered at the Promenade in Westminster to say goodbye and to remember a man who refused to accept the limits that life imposed.

  • Two years ago, I got a call from my friend Mark Obmascik. Mark, a former Denver Post reporter turned author, was working on a new book, and he needed help.

    His previous book, called “The Big Year,” was about hard-core birders who tried to accumulate as many species sightings as they could in 365 days. It was quirky and entertaining, and compelling enough to get me into birding myself.

  • They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder. SB 228 certainly proves that adage in Colorado. When Gov. Bill Ritter signed the bill last week, he characterized the bill as taking a big step toward modernizing Colorado’s state budget. At the same time, Josh Penry, the Senate minority leader and a possible challenger to Ritter in next year’s governor’s race, called the bill “California-style taxing and spending.”