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Opinion

  • Last night, as I opened the lid of the aquarium to put in food, a little hatchet fish jumped out. Apparently he hit the lid hard enough to knock himself out. I tried to help him regain consciousness as best I could. Yet despite my efforts, there was no skill or technology at my disposal that could save him.

  • By Hannah Hayes

    There was a time when you could market a product based on its inherent value. Lately, low price has become the predominant criteria in the marketplace. The world’s largest corporation, Walmart, shares mightily in the creation of that business ethic. The company is even benefiting during these tough economic times as it draws people in with low prices, while many say it’s Walmart that created the difficulties in the first place.

  • Zach is a 6-year-old boy from north Jeffco whose autism makes him prone to wander. A few years ago, Zach walked away from his backyard and through the neighborhood. A neighbor found him and called police, who helped reunite him with his panicked family.

    Zach's family worried that if Zach were to wander away again, he might be lost for hours, or get hurt. Maybe next time he wouldn't encounter a Good Samaritan. Despite their renewed vigilance, they wanted extra reassurance that Zach could be found if he walked away from the house, a store or a park.

  • By Hannah Hayes

    “Stop, In the Name of Love” Oops. Wrong Supremes. Stop? If you think it oh-oh-ver, isn’t this what winning the presidential election is all about? With the largest number of votes ever, President Obama has earned the privilege of nominating a Supreme Court justice.

  • I didn’t watch much television as a kid, but I was a big fan of “Sesame Street.” When “Street” came on at 4 o’clock, I’d hold my breath waiting for Ernie and Bert. Then, at about age 5, I turned on the TV, and who should grace the screen but William Shatner, in all his over-the-top glory, starring as Captain Kirk? From that moment on, “Sesame Street” was a thing of the past.

  • In one way or another, virtually every one of the 120 days in the 2009 session of the Colorado General Assembly was some kind of preview of the 2010 elections.

  • By Hannah Hayes

    A friend recently shared that her grandfather was a union member, and then she said something that really struck me: “That was back when unions were a good thing.” Her comment speaks to the success of management in its long-lived campaign to create a negative image for unions.

  • Journalists are captivated by anniversaries, and that’s one of our biggest failings. The tendency, after an arbitrary number of years, is to find morals and endings, to tie up the loose strings of a tragedy and pronounce the community ready to move on.

  • The article in the Canyon and Columbine couriers on April 22 may have given the impression that Jefferson County’s social services fund would leave the Head Start program short $650,000 and in violation of federal law.

  • Have you ever noticed how every year is the most amazing something in people’s memories? We’ve never had a drier winter. We’ve never had a hotter summer. That’s the best team we’ve ever had. I’ve never seen someone behave so badly. It’s usually not true. Time has a tendency of evening things out.

  • Bonuses have been in the news a lot lately, and the news has not been positive. Most recently, Jeffco’s employee bonus policy has come under scrutiny.

    I do not think bonuses are appropriate for public employees, and I said so two years ago. But my proposal to eliminate bonuses did not get the support of my fellow commissioners. They argued that government should be run more like a business, and bonuses are a legitimate method of acknowledging and rewarding exceptional performance in business.

  • Hannah Hayes

    I loved Kelly’s passionate plea for schools in her Columbine column. It’s ironic and predictably perfect that she would follow it up by advocating for a $300 million cut in higher education this week. Education is the single most important force in creating the kind of citizenry that America needs. An indication that you value schools would be a willingness to pay for them, as our state surely must.

  • Recently, my former colleagues in the state House passed a bill that would make it illegal to drive while talking on a cell phone, unless you’re using a hands-free device. By the looks of it, the ban will pass the Senate and be signed by the governor.

    At first glance, this seems a reasonable law. But it’s also totally redundant. In fact, under current law, a person who causes an accident while talking on a cell phone can be prosecuted under no fewer than four criminal statutes.

  • Witwer relies on discredited assumptions

    Editor:

    Rob Witwer’s column is an example of what Al Gore pointed out in “An Inconvenient Truth,” that the popular press doesn’t hesitate to level the playing field between pure ideology and scientific theory, presenting the former as the equal to the latter, in complete disregard of evidence, logic, and a broad consensus among experts.

  • By Hannah Hayes

    When I see parents waiting at a bus stop, I can remember the multitude of feelings I had when my child came home from school on the day of the Columbine shootings. The illusion of schools as safe havens was irrevocably shattered, as were so many lives. We are all Columbine.

  • Coyotes are active in Jefferson County and the metro area. The following is adapted from Colorado Division of Wildlife literature.

    Coyotes on the Front Range?

    Coyotes are extremely adaptable and can thrive in urban areas. From downtown Denver to the smallest suburb, coyotes are not new to residential communities. They can and will be found in any neighborhood that provides their basic needs — food, water, shelter and space.

     

    Why are they here?

  • For several years, a husband-and-wife team of “environmental artists” named Christo and Jeanne-Claude has proposed a massive project near Canon City titled “Over the River.”

  • By Hannah Hayes

    What do you call 50,000 troops that will be left behind when the U.S. withdraws from Iraq? Re-missioned. How can you re-mission troops when they never had their original mission disclosed?

    But we’re jumping ahead on Iraq (while we’re falling behind at home). The reality today is that lives keep being lost, dollars continue to be spent, and troops still redeploy. It ain’t over, folks.

  • The other day, a friend told me he believes there’s a good chance our kids’ generation will face the same kind of Depression-era challenges our grandparents did. I don’t know whether that’s true. I sure hope not.

    If we had our way, of course, our kids would never face economic hardship. Difficult times lead to deferred dreams, missed opportunities, strained relationships and, in some cases, poverty. There’s nothing good about job losses and a stagnant market.  

  • By Hannah Hayes

    The month of February was devoted to awareness of size and growth of the human population. Did you miss it? Creators of Global Population Speak Out (gpso.wordpress.com) wanted you to catch some of the qualified scientists that spoke publicly on reducing the 218,000-person net gain the planet experiences each day. Bringing new voices into the discussion of population issues is hoped to break down the taboo that exists on this topic.