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Opinion

  • A shell game is under way at the state Capitol. So, what else is new, you ask? Well, this one involves a lot of money, and it is going to affect your own pocketbook — soon.

  • The other day, a friend told me he believes there’s a good chance our kids’ generation will face the same kind of Depression-era challenges our grandparents did. I don’t know whether that’s true. I sure hope not.

    If we had our way, of course, our kids would never face economic hardship. Difficult times lead to deferred dreams, missed opportunities, strained relationships and, in some cases, poverty. There’s nothing good about job losses and a stagnant market.  

  • With the closing of the Rocky Mountain News, it is a great credit to the employees at the paper that they went out with class. The final edition was a retrospective of the paper’s 150 years in Colorado, full of insight and stories that serve to remind all of us what we’ve lost.

    This is an institution that spanned multiple generations of Coloradans. The first Rocky included an advertisement for “brokers and dealers in exchange and gold dust”; the last pitched the T-Mobile G1, a cell phone with Internet connectivity.

  • Jefferson County has the largest unincorporated urban area in the United States; the area known as “South Jeffco” alone contains more than 100,000 residents. If it were to incorporate as a city, it would be among the largest cities in the state.

    When the Colorado Constitution was enacted in 1876, such an urbanized unincorporated area was never imagined. Consequently, the structure of county government in our state makes it difficult for counties to enact ordinances to regulate graffiti and other urban problems.

  • “For suddenly he was thinking … that if he was not a writer, he was not real, that he did not exist.”

    — Robert Penn Warren, in “Flood”

    As Coloradans listen to the echoes of a great voice gone suddenly silent, the words of Robert Penn Warren ring quietly and persistently for me in the void.

  • Coffman puts ideology before economic recovery

    Editor:

    After a decade of choosing to be represented by Tom Tancredo, the most rabid hate-monger in the U.S. government since Joe McCarthy, Congressional District 6 seems determined to continue to embarrass itself and injure the nation by choosing as its congressional delegate the ethically and intellectually challenged partisan hack Mike Coffman.

  • We’ve been hearing every day for months now about the bad economy. Every night we go home to the news of more layoffs and cutbacks. We have all been impacted in some way. I know the Courier has. We have reduced staffing through attrition; as employees have resigned for different opportunities, we have restructured and asked our current employees to take on additional duties.

  • Have you ever wondered how an investigation really unfolds? How forensics experts analyze a crime scene?  How an officer identifies a drunken driver?

    The 11-week Citizens’ Academy is a free program offered by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office to county residents. It is your behind-the-scenes tour through virtually every aspect of our criminal justice system. Participants learn in a classroom setting one night per week, with plenty of interactive activities throughout.

    Following are some of the many class topics.

  • I want to respond to the recent article published in the Courier on Feb. 11, “HOA threatens to pull out of CoHOPE, form another coalition.”

  • It has happened. You were or are going to be laid off. Your soon-to-be-last employer has informed you that you can select COBRA and pay the full 100 percent (plus 2 percent administration) of the premium. You think, “Great, I am covered.”

    However, you find out 45 to 60 days later that your premium is two or three times higher than what you previously contributed. The latter is the norm. I have seen singles and families with $600 and $1,200 monthly premiums, respectively. There go your layoff-package dollars.

  • By Hannah Hayes

    There’s no doubt Jan. 20, 2009, ushered in a color change. Still, racial bigotry is a stubborn, often deeply entrenched characteristic. It’s been only three weeks since the inauguration, three months since the election, and a new president couldn’t possibly jar that manner of thinking loose in such a short time. Could he?

  • In his terrific essay on “Politics and the English Language,” George Orwell observed that “(w)hen there is a gap between one’s real and one’s declared aims, one turns as it were instinctively to long words and exhausted idioms, like a cuttlefish spurting out ink.”

    Orwell spoke of a phenomenon that exists in our time as it did in his — the hijacking of language to conceal the truth behind political objectives.

  • By Hannah B. Hayes

    The issues around immigration are complex. There’s a melting pot of experiences that led most of us here. Every immigrant has a story — often compelling and heart-wrenching. The migration from “my country” to the promise of a better life is a journey into the unknown on an uncertain path through a maze of danger and bureaucracy.

  • Deteriorating bridges across the state, congestion that robs us of time, declining gas taxes because cars are more efficient, and an economy on the fritz. What’s a state to do? If Gov. Bill Ritter, state Sen. Dan Gibbs and state Rep. Joe Rice have their way, we’ll go faster.

  • To kick off 2009, we put together a quiz based on citizen questions and some crime/quality-of-life problems we encounter regularly in Jeffco. We invite you to take the quiz and see if you know the best way to handle the following scenarios.

    Q: You want to teach your young child to stay away from adults who could harm him or her. What’s a good phrase to help them remember?

    a. “Trust no one”

    b. “Say no to strangers”

    c. “Check first before you go anywhere with anyone”

    ANSWER: C

  • Recently, the long-rumored demise of the Rocky Mountain News took another step toward reality. Announcing the paper is up for sale, the E.W. Scripps Co. signaled what may be the end an institution that has been part of Colorado for nearly 150 years.

    The news hit me harder than I expected. For all the other sources of information out there, and there are many, I just can’t imagine life without the Rocky. It’s been a part of my day since I learned to read.

  • The 2008 presidential election created four vacancies in the U.S. Senate: Barack Obama and Joe Biden left open seats in Illinois and Delaware; the new secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, opened up a spot in New York; and of course, Sen. Ken Salazar was nominated as secretary of the interior, paving the way for Gov. Bill Ritter to appoint Michael Bennet, former head of the Denver Public Schools.

  • As we enter 2009, all eyes are focused on the economy. Families and businesses are looking for ways to save money and to be more efficient in these challenging days.

    During these times it is important for our state leaders, as well, to demonstrate the prudent leadership that reflects our priorities. One of the ways of doing this is to limit the 2009 Legislative session to 90 days.

  • By Kelly Weist

    Leftists all agree that one of the first things the president-elect needs to “change” is the situation at Guantanamo Bay. At least, that’s what they thought prior to the election.

  • Several years ago, I heard former Governor Dick Lamm say that the biggest policy challenge of the 21st Century would be sustainability. At the time, I thought he was speaking primarily about environmental issues, but recent events suggest the word encompasses even more than that.

    Of course, environmental sustainability remains a significant issue. As third-world countries catch up to industrialized nations, the problems connected with resource consumption and pollution will continue to grow.