.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Outdoors

  • Harriman Lake Park to remain closed

    Residents will have to wait a few months more before they can use Harriman Lake Park, which has been closed since November 2011 for a project to rebuild the dam. 

    The park, at South Kipling Parkway and West Quincy Avenue, includes a 1.4-mile trail around the lake. Foothills Park & Recreation District has leased much of the park from Denver Water since 1995. Foothills has also leased 11 acres southwest of the lake from Jefferson County Open Space for 15 years.

  • From Peaks to Plains

    A 5-mile stretch of Clear Creek straddling Jefferson and Clear Creek county open spaces will be the focus of a $4.6 million paved-trail project that promises to open up the waterway for kayakers, runners, hikers and cyclists to enjoy.

    The entire project will cost a projected $10.2 million, including $4.5 million in matching funds from Jeffco Open Space and $1.1 million from Clear Creek Open Space.

  • South Platte Park offers wilderness, wildlife amidst an urban area

     By Laura Bernero, for the Courier

    Between Santa Fe Drive and the South Platte River in Littleton, the South Platte Park natural area is a peaceful contrast to the nearby buzz of the city. The river winds through tall cottonwoods, and visitors and wildlife create the only bursts of activity among the seamless woods and wetlands.

    With warm temperatures tempting people to spend time outdoors, the park is in the middle of its busiest season of the year.

  • How does your garden grow?

    The wintry weekend notwithstanding, spring is just around the corner — and with it will come a new gardening season.

    As the snow begins to melt, Colorado master gardener Dawn Miquel wants backyard horticulturalists to think about going native this year.

    Miquel, a volunteer with Colorado State University’s Arapahoe County extension office, said cultivating native plants in the garden offers multiple benefits, including being environmentally friendly. 

  • Balancing outdoor recreational needs with wildlife preservation

    Getting outdoors in wide-open spaces can have health benefits for people. However, converting wild, unspoiled lands into recreational venues for humans can have a questionable impact on wildlife 

    Finding a balance between outdoor recreational needs and wildlife protection was a focus of the PLAN Jeffco conference on Nov. 16 in Golden.

    “Can wildlife survive in these areas humans tend to develop?” Dr. Mat Allredge, wildlife researcher with Colorado Parks and Wildlife, asked during his presentation. “Will all wildlife be tolerated?”

  • Taking a stroll

    Ashley Piniazkiewicz leads a group of women on a brief run during a program called Stroller Strides on May 23 at Clement Park. The group meets regularly to exercise and enjoy camaraderie with other mothers.

  • Staunton State Park gets finishing touches

    The finishing touches are being put on Staunton State Park before its long-awaited debut on May 18.

    “There’s still so much to do,” park manager Jennifer Anderson said of the five weeks leading up to the opening. “Planting trees, hanging signs, (painting) the roads and parking lots — but all the hard work is worth it.”

  • PLAN Jeffco a grassroots organization from its inception

    PLAN Jeffco, a private, nonprofit advocacy group, was founded in 1972 to propose and campaign for a ballot referendum establishing the half-cent sales tax and the Jefferson County Open Space program. 

    The first chair of PLAN Jeffco was Mike Moore of Evergreen, who also served as the campaign manager in the open-space sales-tax campaign.